Today in New Delhi, India
Nov 17, 2018-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Indian bureaucracy needs drastic changes, says Pune civil servants

The officials gave their viewpoints during a special awareness programme for the Union Public Service Commission (UPSC), Maharashtra Public Service Commission (MPSC) and other competitive exam aspirants who gathered in large numbers at the Ganesh Kala Krida Manch on Sunday morning. 

pune Updated: Feb 05, 2018 19:09 IST
Nadeem Inamdar
Nadeem Inamdar
Hindustan Times, Pune
Pune,India,bereaucracy
(From left) Prerana Deshbhratar (IAS), Mahesh Bhagwat (IPS) and Dnyaneshwar M Mulay (IFS) during the interview.(HT PHOTO)

Three top administrative officials, including Dnyaneshwar M Mulay, secretary (CPV and OIA), ministry of external affairs; Prerana Deshbhratar (IAS) and Mahesh Bhagwat (IPS), who were interviewed in Pune on Sunday stressed on bringing about drastic changes in the current administration running the country.

The officials gave their viewpoints during a special awareness programme for the Union Public Service Commission (UPSC), Maharashtra Public Service Commission (MPSC) and other competitive exam aspirants who gathered in large numbers at the Ganesh Kala Krida Manch on Sunday morning.

Journalist Nikhil Wagle interviewed the civil servants at the programme organised by Maharashtra Foundation (America), Muktangan Mitra (Pune) and Sadhana Weekly. The administrators were quizzed chiefly on three important points related to their journey into the profession, field work and guidance to the aspirants.

Dnyaneshwar Mulay said that drastic measures need to be undertaken by the government, including the people of the country, to change India’s governance pattern.

“Governance has to become compassion-oriented and the poorest of the poor must get the benefits of the administrative governance. The government must work for the poor and not drive them away. The anti-poor attitude of the government is still observed in Delhi,” he said.

Mulay further added, “Casteism is a pernicious disease afflicting all the organs of the state and it has to be rooted out at the earliest. The difference between human beings must be erased so that necessary changes can be brought into the Indian society, leading it towards progress and change. A person must now be judged by his status, but on the basis of compassion, which must become the religion of the country,” he added.

Senior IPS Mahesh Bhagwat, currently posted as Rachakonda police commissioner in Telangana, also won the hearts of the aspirants by his pep talk. He said, “I had a passion and flair for Marathi language and took inspiration from senior IAS officer Bhushan Gagrani to write the UPSC exams in Marathi language,” he said.

Known for his amazing ideas and innovative work, Bhagwat added, “Initially, I had certain preconceived notions and wrong understandings about the police force before joining the IPS. I tried for other UPSC services for the next one year after I was allotted the IPS cadre, but by then, I made up my mind to stay in the police department ,” he added.

Pune Smart City Development Corporation Ltd (PSCDCL) chief executive officer Prerana Deshbhratar said that hailing from police background imparted her the necessary strength and capability to make it to the top in the civil services exam. “ Bureaucracy can bring about change in the lives of the people and our initiative has always been to empathise with the poor and help alleviate their suffering. I felt caged while working in the private sector as it dealt only with profits. I took the plunge into civil service as the life of an IAS officer are full of challenges,” she added.

Wagle said that the power of bureaucracy can be used to bring about a complete change in the society by the bureaucrats or can be used to harass citizens, choice lies with them.

First Published: Feb 05, 2018 19:08 IST