Peanut stuck in windpipe for 3 months, timely medical help saves life of 2-year-old Pune girl | pune news | Hindustan Times
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Peanut stuck in windpipe for 3 months, timely medical help saves life of 2-year-old Pune girl

Patient undergoes a 20-minute procedure with flexible bronchoscopy to remove the foreign body.

pune Updated: Mar 28, 2018 18:31 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, Pune
According to paediatric surgeon Dr Pranav Jadhav, cases of a foreign body getting stuck in the windpipe are not rare but can prove to be fatal if not diagnosed timely.
According to paediatric surgeon Dr Pranav Jadhav, cases of a foreign body getting stuck in the windpipe are not rare but can prove to be fatal if not diagnosed timely.(HT REPRESENTATIONAL PHOTO)

Timely intervention by a city-based hospital helped save a two-year-old girl from Pune who had a peanut struck in her windpipe for three months.

According to the hospital authorities, the girl showed chronic symptoms of wheezing and coughing for three months when she visited them. Apart from wheezing, the patient was suffering from choking and severe breathing discomfort to the extent that the child had turned blue with her lungs unable to get enough oxygen. The patient had even visited multiple health facilities before.

Speaking about the incident, Dr Archana Kher, consultant paediatrician, Columbia Asia Hospital, Pune, where the girl was diagnosed, said, “This was a classic case of tracheobronchial foreign bodies, in which children, especially under five years of age, swallow or inhale foreign bodies such as peanuts, small plastic or metallic parts of toys, or any other small object. But instead of the object going down through the oesophagus, it goes down the windpipe or trachea, blocking the airway passage. Sometimes these objects can also get inhaled. This is highly dangerous as a child or a person can die out of lack of oxygen.

“In this particular case, the child had gone to multiple doctors and the problem went undiagnosed. In the process, the kid had undergone X-rays and other tests. Only when the family revealed about a choking episode three months earlier, was it evident that this could be a case of tracheobronchial foreign bodies.”

Dr Arvind Tiwari said that a high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest was conducted. "A8 x 4 mm sized foreign body particle was stuck in the chest. The girl was admitted and we performed a 20-minute procedure with flexible bronchoscopy to remove the foreign body and it turned out to be a peanut," he said.

According to paediatric surgeon Dr Pranav Jadhav, such cases of a foreign body getting stuck in the windpipe are not rare. He said that such cases are frequent and can prove to be fatal if not diagnosed timely.