Today in New Delhi, India
Nov 18, 2018-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Bedsores can be avoided by training caregivers, says PGI study

The study, Comparison of Two Intervention Strategies on Prevention of Bedsores among the Bedridden Patients: A Quasi Experimental Community-based Trial, is published in the Indian Journal of Palliative Care.

punjab Updated: Feb 19, 2018 09:43 IST
Tanbir Dhaliwal
Tanbir Dhaliwal
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research,Chandigarh,Indian Journal of Palliative Care
The study was conducted in Chandigarh where in 78 bedridden patients being taken care in their homes were identified.(Representative image)

Bedsores, which are common among bedridden patients, can be avoided by providing proper training to family members, who are looking after them, suggests a study conducted by experts from the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER).

The study, Comparison of Two Intervention Strategies on Prevention of Bedsores among the Bedridden Patients: A Quasi Experimental Community-based Trial, is published in the Indian Journal of Palliative Care.

According to experts, More than 80% of bedridden patients develop bedsores in home care settings and training given to informal caregivers can significantly affect the quality of care to these patients.

Bedsores — caused by unrelieved pressure over the areas, where bones are close to the surface, called bony prominences — are the most prevalent wounds among the bedridden patients. Over 80% of such patients ever develop bedsores, which are among one of the most costly and physically debilitating complications.

The study mentions that one-to-one training along with SIM distribution yielded better results than only using instruction manual.

A team of experts from the PGIMER conducted a study to compare the effectiveness of two training strategies for caregivers on prevention of bedsores.

The study was conducted in Chandigarh where in 78 bedridden patients being taken care in their homes were identified. They were then divided into two segments: Group A and Group B.

The Group A received ‘Prevention Package 1’ that included self-instruction manual (SIM), training and counselling. The various components involved in training included positioning of the patients, changing their postures, changing their bedsheets and clothes and feeding them among others.

“The caregivers were advised to change the bedsheets of the patients daily, to perform a range of motion active and passive exercises at least twice a day, and to change the position of the patients every two to three hours,” mentions the study.

Group B received ‘Prevention Package 2’ that included only self-instruction manual.

All patients were observed for one year for their bedsore development.

“During every visit, the percentage reduction of number of patients at risk of bedsore development was more in Group A as compared to Group B,” the study finds.

There was 100% improvement in mobility level of the patients, who were totally dependent in both groups. “However, in moderately dependant patients, the improvement in mobility level was more in Group A at 87% as compared to Group B at 75%,” the study says.

The study mentions that one-to-one training along with SIM distribution yielded better results than only using instruction manual.

“Training of caregivers for the prevention of bedsores among the bedridden patients was effective in improving the practices of the caregivers and also in reducing the risk factors of bedsores,” the study concludes.

First Published: Feb 19, 2018 09:40 IST