Ludhiana: The curious case of pati, patni and social media | punjab | ludhiana | Hindustan Times
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Ludhiana: The curious case of pati, patni and social media

Experts believe that in 80% of the cases related to marital discord, the divide was created by one partner’s addiction to virtual platforms such as Facebook and WhatsApp.

punjab Updated: Mar 13, 2018 15:50 IST
Amarpal Singh
According to the data collated by the women cell in Ludhiana, 4,731 complaints of marital disputes were received in 2017.
According to the data collated by the women cell in Ludhiana, 4,731 complaints of marital disputes were received in 2017.(Illustration by Daljeet Kaur Sandhu/HT)

The virtual world is increasingly leading to marital discord among coupes in Ludhiana. Experts are blaming the 21.36% rise in cases of marital disputes in the city during the last one year to excessive use of social media.

They believe that in 80% of these cases, the divide was created by one partner’s addiction to virtual platforms such as Facebook and WhatsApp.

According to the data collated by the women cell here, 4,731 complaints of marital disputes were received in 2017 as compared to 3,898 in 2016. The percentage increase was much higher than in 2015-2016 when cases relating to matrimonial disputes went up by a mere 9.46%.

Randhir Singh, assistant commissioner of police (ACP), Crime against Women (CAW) cell, says, “There are frequent complaints that women sitting idle at home spend more time on social media than on household chores. As a result, they have limited interaction with their in-laws and fail to build relationships.”

An official at CAW recounts how a marriage was on the verge of collapse only because the wife remained busy on WhatsApp and ignored both her husband and in-laws.

CAW officials say most of such complaints come from couples in the age group of 22 to 31.

A seedy affair

Singh said access to social media is also leading to extra-marital affairs, which are causing marriages to break up. “At times, both partners continue their previous romantic dalliances through Facebook and WhatsApp, without realising the consequences of their actions,” he added.

Sub inspector Kiran Lata, CAW cell, claimed that when it comes to such virtual relationships, there are more complaints against women than men. “Complaints against men usually relate to physical abuse and dowry,” she said. CAW officials say most of such complaints come from couples in the age group of 22 to 31. A city-based psychiatrist Dr Rajiv Gupta said that on an average he deals with six cases of marital dispute among young couples every day.

Admitting that the use of social media is fuelling needless suspicion and distrust among couples, Dr Gupta said in one of the cases he is counselling, the husband complained that his wife shuts her laptop the moment she sees he is back from work. “He said when he asked for her password, she refused and called up her mother who got into an argument with him,” said Gupta.

Another marriage ran into trouble when a woman found her husband chatting with a girl on Facebook at night.

Social media, said Dr Gupta, also leads to unrealistic expectations among youngsters. He explained, “Newly-married girls sometimes spend a lot of time on the social media. They tend to live in an unreal world in which they want everything to be perfect so that they can upload pictures and ‘boast’ about their great life. When not fulfilled, such high expectations lead to frustration and disputes.”

Dr Gupta added that at times in-laws too have high expectations from the new brides. “They want the girls to work, to share the expenses of the family besides doing all the domestic chores. This tends to put too much pressure on the new brides.”