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Home / Punjab / Turning 18 with HT: ‘Brightest Indian minds prefer working abroad’

Turning 18 with HT: ‘Brightest Indian minds prefer working abroad’

Banyan Tree School captain Karman Singh has his heart set on becoming a pilot in Australia and says corruption, nepotism and biases are leading to brain drain

punjab Updated: May 03, 2018 11:09 IST
Aishwarya Khosla
Aishwarya Khosla
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
GOAL-ORIENTED: A non-medical student, he is a goalkeeper, dog lover and an avid reader, meet Karman Singh, the school captain at Banyan Tree School, Sector 48, Chandigarh, who aspires to become a pilot.
GOAL-ORIENTED: A non-medical student, he is a goalkeeper, dog lover and an avid reader, meet Karman Singh, the school captain at Banyan Tree School, Sector 48, Chandigarh, who aspires to become a pilot. (Sikander Singh/HT)

His greatest fear is exams and the nerve-wracking anticipation of results and his fantasy is to play an international football tournament with Messi, meet Karman Singh:

Name: Karman Singh

Born on: August 25, 1999

Badge of honour: School captain, Banyan Tree School, Sector 48, Chandigarh

What turning 18 means to me

It symbolises a big change. It means living on my own for the first time, making new friends and making myself at home in an unfamiliar city. It also means taking full responsibility for my decisions and actions. It is the age when I finally begin laying the groundwork for a successful future.

What I want to be and why

I want to become a pilot for an international airline. It would give me the opportunity to explore different countries and diverse cultures. I can’t wait to set my eyes on the breathtaking view visible only from the cockpit.

My idea of India

India is inching towards becoming a developed country. It is unfortunate but true that the brightest minds in this country prefer working abroad. Corruption, nepotism and gender bias are to be blamed.

What makes me happy

Dogs. My parents don’t allow me to keep pets in our house so I make do by feeding strays. The excitement with which the dogs greet me makes my day. Football and swimming are mood boosters.

What makes me angry

Insensitive statements made by politicians.

Fear and fantasy

My greatest fear is exams and the nerve-wracking anticipation of results.

It is a fantasy to play an international football tournament with Argentine footballer Lionel Messi.

Am I happy where I am?

Yes, I’m considering a few aviation programmes in Adelaide, Australia. I’m eagerly waiting for the future to unfold.

What money means to me

Money is important to lead a quality life. However, happiness and health trump money any day. The most valuable things in life cannot be bought.

What makes me proud of India

The unique culture, including our joint family system. I’m proud of Indian values, particularly respecting elders.

What I can’t live without

My family and football. My world revolves around my parents Col Sukhdev Singh (retd), and Rajpreet Kaur, who’s an English teacher, and my elder sister Mehak Nanner.

What social media means to me

Social media can be a waste of time. People mindlessly scroll away their day and eventually their lives on social media.

Change I’d like to see in Chandigarh

It’s a clean and green city but the public transport system needs to be upgraded.

What religion means to me

One should be God fearing with a humanitarian outlook. Squabbling over faith is petty.

My role model and why

My sister, Mehak, 27, who is a management consultant in Gurgaon, is my role model. She has excelled at everything she put her mind to, be it academic, professional or artistic. She inspires me to strive for excellence.