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Home / Punjab / Turning 18 with HT: ‘Empower girls, don’t treat them like victims’

Turning 18 with HT: ‘Empower girls, don’t treat them like victims’

Agent of change: Niharika says educated youngsters can lead the change our country needs, particularly in clean administration and gender equality.

punjab Updated: May 07, 2018 16:15 IST
Yojana Yadav
Yojana Yadav
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
CONFIDENT LEADER: Niharika Kaushal, the outgoing captain of DC Montessori Senior Secondary Smart School, Chandigarh, finds dancing a stress buster and believes in celebrating womanhood.
CONFIDENT LEADER: Niharika Kaushal, the outgoing captain of DC Montessori Senior Secondary Smart School, Chandigarh, finds dancing a stress buster and believes in celebrating womanhood. (Karun Sharma/HT)

She wants to become a lecturer of English and believes the young population can be the agent of change:

Name: Niharika Kaushal

Born on: October 2, 2000

Badge of honour: School captain, DC Montessori Senior Secondary Smart School, Manimajra, Chandigarh

What turning 18 means to me

Turning 18 evokes both excitement and nostalgia. I’m excited about going to college but I’m also nostalgic about leaving my childhood behind.

What I want to be and why

I want to become a lecturer of English in a college. I’ve been a commerce student for the past two years but will be opting for English honours at MCM DAV College for Women, Chandigarh. I will also try and fulfil my father Raman Kaushal’s dream of becoming an IAS officer.

My idea of India

India is a nation of diverse cultures, religions and thoughts. The young population can be the agent of change our society needs whether it is to fight corruption in the system or gender bias.

What makes me happy

Making others smile makes me happy. I love dancing whether its Haryanvi folk dance or giddha or freestyle. I dance to relax.

What makes me angry

Crimes against women anger me. On a personal level, it upsets me if I don’t achieve the goal I set.

My fear and fantasy

Sometimes I fear monsters after watching a horror movie.

It’s a fantasy to be the queen of the universe.

Am I happy where I am?

Yes, I’m looking forward to college. I’m not worried about the results because I don’t run after marks. There’s much more to me than academics.

What money means to me

I should be financially independent. I know money can’t buy me happiness. It can buy me a comfortable bed but not sleep.

What makes me proud of India

I’m sorry I’m not proud of a country where eight-month-old girls are raped or where policemen take bribe to let defaulters go. We need to end this culture and instil respect for the law.

What I can’t live without

I can’t do without oxygen, water and food, particularly sweets.

What social media means to me

It connects people, bridges distances and keeps us updated. It’s a boon provided it’s used in a balanced way.

Change I want to see in Panchkula

It needs to be cleaner and greener. Traffic rules need to be implemented strictly and helmets should be a must for all.

Changes I want to see in India

Our politicians need to work for a united India. They should speak up on issues that matter. A country that worships goddesses ought to empower its women to fight back. Don’t treat women as victims. I want to join educated young Indians in leading the change.

What religion means to me

God is within each one of us. I don’t believe in ‘babas’ because human beings can’t take the place of God.

My role model and why

I draw inspiration from elders in the family. My paternal grandfather, late MS Kaushal, was a social worker after he retired as a bank manager. He found happiness in serving others. I want to be like him. My father is my guide and my mother, Pankaj Kaushal, who is a social studies teacher in Barwala, is my best friend. She has taught me to work hard and celebrate life.

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