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Youngsters now use ‘Hinglish’ to text and talk

All this change has come at the expense of Hindi as HT spoke to students and teachers about the relevance of Hindi in our lives.

punjab Updated: Sep 15, 2018 10:25 IST
Srishti Jaswal
Srishti Jaswal
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
Youngsters,Hinglish,Chandigarh
(HT Photo)

On the occasion of ‘Hindi Diwas’, colleges in Chandigarh held debates, declamations, poetry recitations, and other events to promote the language. But given the transformation we have undergone in terms of our usage of Hindi and English in our day-to-day living, a fusion of the two languages — ‘Hinglish’ — has become popular among the youth. Overtime, the youngsters have even incorporated it in texting and talking.

All this change has come at the expense of Hindi as HT spoke to students and teachers about the relevance of Hindi in our lives.

‘English is language of class’

Gurusha, a student of MCM DAV College for Women, Sector 36, said, “In daily life conversations we use Hinglish. However, in a situation where we know we are being judged, we use English because it represents class and is considered a language of the educated.”

Priya, a student of Post Graduate Government College for Girl (PGGCG), Sector 11, said, “I think the current generation is neither proficient in Hindi nor English. A mix of the two has become the mode of our conversations now.”

Rahul Sharma, a student of DAV College, Sector 10, said, “Events such as Hindi Diwas are important to save the language as people are forgetting it. Hindi Diwas is trending on Twitter, but people are writing messages in English.”

‘Colonial hangover, blame publications ’

Aparna Kaushal, head of English department, Post Graduate Government College, Sector 11, said, “I teach English, but I always motivate my students to be proficient in Hindi because leaving our mother tongue behind is a symptom of colonial mindset.”

Prasoon Prasad, head of Hindi department, MCM DAV College Sector 36, said, “Some mainstream publications use English words for simplification of texts in headlines and articles, but this pollutes the language.” She added, “It is painful to witness that we have to hold an annual event to promote our mother tongue.”

Hindi Diwas is celebrated on September 14 as on this day in 1949, the Constituent Assembly adopted Hindi as one of the official languages of India.

First Published: Sep 15, 2018 10:25 IST