Books on food nostalgia, the uses and excitement of lifelong learning, and colonialism feature on the list of recommended reads this week. (HT Team)
Books on food nostalgia, the uses and excitement of lifelong learning, and colonialism feature on the list of recommended reads this week. (HT Team)

HT Picks: New Reads

Recipes, nostalgia, the art of picking up new skills, and an exploration of Britain’s strange collective amnesia about its colonial past feature on this week’s reading list
By HT Team
PUBLISHED ON MAR 05, 2021 11:30 PM IST

Recipes and reminiscences

210pp, ₹550; Hachette
210pp, ₹550; Hachette

In this well-seasoned medley of memories and meals, Indranee Ghosh brings together charming vignettes from her youth in the densely-forested Khasi Hills and in Bengal with a delectable selection of recipes passed down over the generations. Anecdotes about eccentric kith and kin, folklore from the time of the Second World War and chronicles of Partition are served up in a warm and engaging narrative along with accounts of audacious kitchen adventures and fascinating nuggets of hard-learnt culinary techniques. Featuring over 70 recipes that represent a mix of Bengali, Khasi and Nepali cuisines, Spiced, Smoked, Pickled, Preserved will introduce you to a variety of exciting fare. From essential spice mixes to forgotten dishes reinvented over time, from fermented delicacies like shidol in pumpkin leaves to sizzling pan-roasted tilapiya, from hearty fish stew to mouth-watering pork in plum sauce, and from sweet and sour fish roa ambal to a delicious tangerine payesh – every dish in this deeply personal collection has been tried, tested and practised to perfection. Whether you are an intrepid gastronome wanting to take your repertoire a bit further, or a foodie looking for a comforting bowl of goodness and fresh flavour to tickle your taste buds – this treasure trove of treats is your must-have culinary guide.*

Lifelong learning

299pp, ₹599; Atlantic Books
299pp, ₹599; Atlantic Books

For many of us, learning new skills is for childhood. Upon becoming an adult, we shy away from trying new things, instead preferring to stay in our comfort zone. Beginners turns this assumption on its head: why are children the only ones allowed to experience the inherent fun of facing daily challenges? Could we benefit from embracing new skills, even if we’re initially hopeless? What does learning do for the brain? Bestselling author Tom Vanderbilt sets out to find the answers, tasking himself with acquiring several new skills under tutelage of professionals, including singing, juggling, chess, surfing and much more. Witty, intelligent and often surprisingly profound, Beginners is an uplifting exploration of how we can learn to learn anew.*

Imperialism and Modern Britain

306pp, ₹999; Penguin
306pp, ₹999; Penguin

The British Empire ran for centuries and covered vast swathes of the world. It is, as Sanghera reveals, fundamental to understanding Britain. However, even among those who celebrate the empire there seems to be a desire not to look at it too closely – not to include the subject in school history books, not to emphasize it too much in the nation’s favourite museums. At a time of great division in Britain, Sanghera’s book urges readers to address this bewildering contradiction.*

*All copy from book flap

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