New Delhi -°C
Today in New Delhi, India

Jan 20, 2020-Monday
-°C

Humidity
-

Wind
-

Select city

Metro cities - Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata

Other cities - Noida, Gurgaon, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Bhopal , Chandigarh , Dehradun, Indore, Jaipur, Lucknow, Patna, Ranchi

Monday, Jan 20, 2020
Home / Chandigarh / Clash of two papers leaves PSEB Class 12 students in a quandary

Clash of two papers leaves PSEB Class 12 students in a quandary

Exams for Sanskrit and music vocal will be conducted on March 4

chandigarh Updated: Jan 16, 2020 23:28 IST
Deepa Sharma Sood
Deepa Sharma Sood
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
Hindustantimes
         

After the goof-up of changing syllabus for Class 12 science stream students just three months ahead of board examinations, the Punjab School Education Board (PSEB) is again in the thick of a controversy for clash of two papers — Sanskrit and music vocal — exams for which are to be conducted on March 4.

As a result, scores of Class 12 students of humanities group across the state are left in a quandary. In Ludhiana, authorities of two schools have written to the board to revise the date sheet as the students can’t afford to miss one of the papers.

The board revised the date sheet of Class 12 recently. According to the earlier date sheet released by the board, exams for the two papers were to be conducted on different dates — music vocal on March 4 and Sanskrit on March 16.

Asha Pahuja, principal of RS Model Senior Secondary School, Shastri Nagar, said, “We have written to the board to revise the date sheet as students are worried regarding the clash in dates of two exams. We sent a representative from the school to the board to submit a letter in this regard, but he was not allowed to hand it over to the secretary or any other official of the board.”

She said, “The students’ future is at stake and the board officials must change the date for one exam so that students can prepare for the board exams without any stress.”

Neeru Kaura, principal of BCM Senior Secondary School, Focal Point, said, “We have 12 students in our school who have opted for both subjects. We sent a mail to the board to make changes last week, but till date we have received no reply from the board.”

WILL RESOLVE THE

PROBLEM: BOARD SECY

Janak Raj Mehrok, board secretary, said, “We will resolve the problem after discussing the issue with the higher authorities. There must be 25 to 30 students across the state who are facing this problem and a decision will be taken at the earliest.”