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At 24, Delhi records the lowest Covid daily fatality in 65 days

Delhi on Friday reported 24 Covid-19 deaths, the lowest daily toll in 65 days, according to the data shared by Delhi government in its daily health bulletin
By HT Correspondent, New Delhi
PUBLISHED ON JUN 11, 2021 11:36 PM IST

Delhi on Friday reported 24 Covid-19 deaths, the lowest daily toll in 65 days, according to the data shared by Delhi government in its daily health bulletin. The city also reported 238 new cases on Friday -- the second time this week that daily cases have fallen below the 300-mark.

The test positivity rate – proportion of samples that returns positive – is also on the decline in Delhi, with the city reporting a 0.31% positivity rate, which is the lowest after the April-May surge in cases.

The seven day rolling average case fatality ratio (CFR) – proportion of deaths among those who test positive – has also started decreasing. It had shot up to 12.4% when the number of cases in the city dipped suddenly but deaths due to the viral infection continued to remain high.

On Friday, the CFR stood at 11.8%, according to data. The cumulative CFR – based on the total number of cases and deaths so far – stands at 1.73%, higher compared to national average of 1.24%.

So far, 24,772 people have succumbed to the infection since the first death was reported on March 13, 2020. In comparison, 60 persons had died in one of the worst dengue outbreaks in Delhi in 2015 that affected nearly 16,000 people. Covid-19 has affected 1.43 million people in the city so far.

“The proportion of population which is vaccinated is still minute in India. While vaccine is the major weapon for fighting the pandemic, equally or more important is Covid-appropriate behaviour, which is in our control. We understand that complacency was one of the major reasons for the second wave. If we do not follow norms we would be doing nothing but inviting a third wave,” said Dr GC Khilnani, former head of the department of pulmonology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences.

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