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Home / Delhi News / Jamia violence: How have you punished erring officers, HC asks Delhi Police

Jamia violence: How have you punished erring officers, HC asks Delhi Police

Citing a National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) report on the Jamia violence, a bench of Chief Justice DN Patel and Justice Prateek Jalan said it had pointed out instances of police violence and that no action had been taken so far.

delhi Updated: Sep 19, 2020, 04:49 IST
Richa Banka
Richa Banka
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
The bench sought to know from Additional Solicitor General (ASG) Aman Lekhi, representing Delhi police, whether FIRs had been registered against erring police officials.
The bench sought to know from Additional Solicitor General (ASG) Aman Lekhi, representing Delhi police, whether FIRs had been registered against erring police officials.(HT file photo)

The Delhi High Court on Friday sought to know from Delhi Police what action they had taken against police officers who allegedly used excessive force against students of Jamia Milia Islamia violence during the violence that had broken out at the university in December last year.

Citing a National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) report on the Jamia violence, a bench of Chief Justice DN Patel and Justice Prateek Jalan said it had pointed out instances of police violence and that no action had been taken so far.

It sought to know from Additional Solicitor General (ASG) Aman Lekhi, representing Delhi police, whether FIRs had been registered against erring police officials.

Lekhi said an enquiry is on against individual cases where some police officers used excessive force. However, the NHRC report supports police intervention, he said.

The court said, “But you need to satisfy us as to what action has been taken against those individual cases? Whether FIRs have been registered against those police officers?.

The court was hearing a bunch of pleas seeking relief in the Jamia violence while urging for the constitution of an SIT or a court-monitored probe in the matter.

Lekhi justified the police action, saying the officials were constrained because there was stone-pelting from inside the varsity. He said the mob started vandalising the properties and blocking the roads.

To this the bench remarked, “The argument is not that you don’t have a right to enter the University. The argument is that you should have taken prior approval of the admin before doing so.”

Violence had broken out in the varsity after student protests against the Citizenship (Amendment) Act (CAA). Police have been accused of entering the campus and assaulting students after protests against the Act turned violent on December 15.

At least 10 vehicles were allegedly torched by protesters. The Jamia students had said they were not involved in the violence and that their peaceful march was hijacked by outsiders.

ht epaper

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