Crocodile rescued , released in Chambal river

Updated on Oct 29, 2022 12:41 AM IST

Earlier this week, villagers spotted the mugger crocodile near an agricultural field in Baswapur and alerted the forest department. The foresters informed Wildlife SOS on its 24x7 rescue helpline. Ensuring all precautionary measures, the WL-SOS team then used a safety net to carefully extricate the crocodile. The reptile was found to be healthy and was later released in the Chambal river in Etawah

The crocodile was believed to have ventured into the field via a canal, located approximately 2 km away. (Sourced)
The crocodile was believed to have ventured into the field via a canal, located approximately 2 km away. (Sourced)

Agra ::: In a recent late-night operation, conservation NGO Wildlife SOS rescued a nearly 5-ft-long mugger crocodile (crocodylus palustris) spotted in an agricultural field near Baswapur village in Mainpuri district. The crocodile was later released into its natural habitat in the presence of forest department officials.

Earlier this week, villagers spotted the mugger crocodile near an agricultural field in Baswapur and alerted the forest department. The foresters informed Wildlife SOS on its 24x7 rescue helpline.

Geared with the necessary rescue equipment, the NGO’s rapid response unit based out of Agra travelled for nearly two hours to reach the location. The three-member team arrived at the site late in the night and scanned the surroundings for any unwanted crowd. Ensuring all precautionary measures, the team then used a safety net to carefully extricate the crocodile.

The crocodile was believed to have ventured into the field via a canal, located approximately 2 km away. The reptile was found to be healthy and was later released in the Chambal river in Etawah district in the presence of forest department officials.

Kartick Satyanarayan, co-founder and CEO, Wildlife SOS said, “Even though there is increased awareness among people in rural areas about the presence of mugger crocodiles, many are caught unawares when they spot a wild crocodile in their village. However, the villagers in this case were extremely cooperative and kept a watch till the experts arrived. This goes to show how much of an impact awareness and education can bring. We are glad that neither the crocodile nor the villagers were hurt in this case.”

Baiju Raj M.V, director, conservation projects, Wildlife SOS said, “Mugger crocodiles are most commonly found in freshwater environments such as rivers, lakes, hill streams, village ponds and man-made reservoirs. In this case, the canal must have created a route for the crocodile to enter this area since this region is not known for any well-suited crocodile habitat.”

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
SHARE
Story Saved
OPEN APP
×
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
My Offers
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Thursday, February 02, 2023
Start 15 Days Free Trial Subscribe Now
Register Free and get Exciting Deals