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BCCI units push case before Supreme Court hearing

The Amicus, who has held meetings in batches, heard state cricket bodies from Karnataka, Northeast associations like Arunachal Pradesh, Saurashtra, Baroda, and Maharashtra among others on Wednesday.

cricket Updated: Apr 25, 2019 00:09 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
BCCI,Supreme Court,PS Narasimha
A view of logo of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI).(Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

After discussing with state bodies and CoA members their objections in the implementation of the new BCCI constitution, the Supreme Court-appointed Amicus Curiae PS Narasimha is set to be heard by the Apex Court on Thursday.

The Amicus, who has held meetings in batches, heard state cricket bodies from Karnataka, Northeast associations like Arunachal Pradesh, Saurashtra, Baroda, and Maharashtra among others on Wednesday.

The objections relate to office-bearers’ tenure, voting rights to players and district bodies, as well as the size of the state body’s apex council. The objections show they don’t want any interference in their composition and want to decide on the voters on their own.

The Tamil Nadu Cricket Association (TNCA) which was the first body to meet the Amicus a few days back, and informally represented other state bodies by putting forward objections common to many, had differences on the following issues:

Players’ vote: It is willing to give membership to players but don’t want to give them voting rights.

Apex Council: The state bodies want to decide on the strength of the state body’s Apex Council. They don’t want a restriction on the number of vice-presidents or joint secretaries as is the mandate and practice at the BCCI.

Disqualification: They want disqualified office-bearers (due to age or tenure) to be able to continue in the executive committee.

Tenure: They want the 18-year cap on office-bearers’ tenure to be distributed evenly (nine years each) in state body and BCCI, and not a combined 18-year tenure at either.

“We have already incorporated certain points in the constitution without prejudice to the Supreme Court -- like 70-year age cap, three-year cooling off period as well as the appointment of ombudsman and election officer, two players representatives in the executive committee, one representative of the CAG in the committee. Only in smaller issues, we have some problems,” said a state body representative.

Another major issue is conflict of interest -- like in the case of Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB) president Sourav Ganguly, who does commentary, and is also a part of the IPL team Delhi Capitals as an advisor.

Proxy not gone yet?

Among associations that met the Amicus and CoA on Wednesday was a district body, the Porbandar Cricket Association (PCA) which is unhappy with its parent body, the Saurashtra Cricket Association for not allowing districts the right to vote. PCA executive vice-president Rajesh Jadeja said they have complained to the Amicus in writing.

“We have 17 districts but unfortunately, while we can play cricket and supply cricketers to the state team, we have no right to vote in elections. Eleven districts are unhappy,” said Jadeja.

First Published: Apr 25, 2019 00:09 IST

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