Neighbours to help India in tiger estimation
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Neighbours to help India in tiger estimation

Chitwan National Park in Nepal supports the tiger population in Valmiki (Bihar). Similarly, the tiger populations of Bardiya (Nepal)-Katarniaghat (Uttar Pradesh) and Shuklaphanta (Nepal)-Pilibhit (Uttar Pradesh) compliment each other.

dehradun Updated: Oct 31, 2017 20:26 IST
Nihi Sharma
Nihi Sharma
Hindustan Times
Uttarakhand,tiger,NTCA
The exercise aims at counting the tigers whose habitats are geographically separated but spread across India, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Nepal.(HT File)

DEHRADUN:India will conduct its tiger estimation survey along with neigbours Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh for which the National Tiger Conservation Authority, the apex body formulating policies for conservation of striped cats, has given the nod.

The exercise aims at counting the tigers whose habitats are geographically separated but spread across the four countries.

At a meeting in Delhi on October 30, the Authority discussed the plan with Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal and Assam which share border with the three neighbouring countries. It is already conducting training for field staff and will start Phase 1 of the estimation from December. Consultation workshops will be organised with the forest departments of the three countries to finalise the period during which similar exercise will be held there as well.

“The Global Tiger Forum is pitching in to maintain a dialogue with the three countries. Only areas adjoining India have reported tiger presence, So, we will restrict to conducting the estimation in these pockets only,” NTCA member secretary Debabrata Swain told Hindustan Times on Tuesday.

In its September 28 edition, HT reported the tiger estimation would be done with the neighbouring countries.

Chitwan National Park in Nepal supports the tiger population in Valmiki (Bihar). Similarly, the tiger populations of Bardiya (Nepal)-Katarniaghat (Uttar Pradesh) and Shuklaphanta (Nepal)-Pilibhit (Uttar Pradesh) compliment each other. The northern boundary of Shuklaphanta (Nepal) touches Champawat in Uttarakhand.

The Sundarban is spread over in West Bengal and Bangladesh, and, therefore, the survey will be done on either side of the tiger reserve. Incidentally, the northernmost part of Bengal touches Bhutan. “Tigers in border areas have been supporting population on both sides. The estimation will help to determine a holistic figure of the tiger populated landscape,” Bivash Pandav, a scientist at Dehradun-based Wildlife Institute of India, said.

First Published: Oct 31, 2017 20:26 IST