155 rapes in Delhi committed by minors, govt says juvenile crime up by 5% in 2016

A study by the Delhi Commission for Protection of Child Rights (DCPCR) says parental neglect is the main factor that forces juveniles into crime

delhi Updated: Aug 10, 2017 10:40 IST
Azaan Javaid
Azaan Javaid
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
Juvenile crime,Lok Sabha,Rape in Delhi
People gathered at Jantar Mantar in 2015 to protest against the release of a juvenile who raped a 23-year-old paramedical student in Delhi on December 16, 2012. (Raj K Raj/HT Photo)

Delhi witnessed more than 5% increase in crimes, including rapes and thefts, committed by juveniles in 2016, according to government data.

The data was provided by Union minister of state for home Hansraj Gangaram Ahir in the Lok Sabha on Tuesday. He was responding to a question by Shiv Sena’s Rajan Vichare in the Lower House.

The number of crimes allegedly committed by juveniles last year was 2499, up from 2366 in 2015, with a significant increase in the number of rapes and vehicle thefts. The total number of juveniles apprehended by Delhi Police in 2016 was 3808, 238 more than that in 2015.

Rapes allegedly committed by juveniles saw a 23% rise - 155 in 2016 from 119 in 2015 - and theft of vehicles doubled between 2015 and 2016. While the total number of thefts decreased from 530 to 497 in 2016, thefts of vehicles by minors increased to 288 last year from 139 in 2015.

Robbery committed by minors also witnessed a dip from 457 in 2015 to 382 in 2016.

Among the heinous crimes that also saw a dip last year was murder. A total of 56 juveniles were involved in murders in 2016 as compared to 64 in 2015, however, the number of attempt to murder increased from 51 in 2015 to 83 last year.

“As a preventive strategy to control crimes by juveniles, Delhi Police has started the scheme ‘Yuva’ for young adults and street children of the society. Under this scheme, workshops, sports activities and vocational training etc. are being organized to channelise the energy of young adults and children to make them productive members of the society and prevent them from moving towards crime and drugs at an early age,” Ahir said.

“Police personnel are also detailed in plainclothes as well as in uniform in and around the educational institutions, busy markets, bus stops and other vulnerable places to prevent crimes,” he added.

Experts say parental neglect, lack of education, poverty, and absence of a support system, at school and home, are forcing juveniles into crime in the Capital. A study by the Delhi Commission for Protection of Child Rights (DCPCR) has described parental neglect as the main factor which forces juveniles into the world of crime.

The study has found that only 29% of the children’s parents spend quality time with them.

First Published: Aug 09, 2017 12:24 IST