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Home / Delhi News / Heavier fines: Delhi traffic police to record offences on camera to avoid arguments

Heavier fines: Delhi traffic police to record offences on camera to avoid arguments

Joint commissioner of police (traffic) Narendra Singh Bundela said with the fines for traffic offences increasing multifold, there was a high possibility of violators contesting the fines. To avoid such instances, the department has directed officials to record offences using body worn cameras and digital cameras.

delhi Updated: Sep 03, 2019, 09:45 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
The first day when the amended Motor Vehicles Act came into force, over 3,900 fines were issued.
The first day when the amended Motor Vehicles Act came into force, over 3,900 fines were issued.(Sakib Ali/Hindustan Times)

The Delhi Traffic Police on Monday said that to implement the increased fines under the amended Motor Vehicles Act better, the force will record violations on video as evidence.

Joint commissioner of police (traffic) Narendra Singh Bundela said with the fines for traffic offences increasing multifold, there was a high possibility of violators contesting the fines. To avoid such instances, the department has directed officials to record offences using body worn cameras and digital cameras.

“We have provided nearly 626 body worn cameras to our officials to record the offences and to avoid any argument or violence that might ensue during challaning the violators,” said Bundela.

He said apart from the body worn cameras, violations such as red light jumping and stop line violations will be recorded using digital cameras. Offences will also be recorded on speed detection and CCTV cameras that have been installed by the department at traffic heavy crossings.

On Sunday, the first day when the amended Motor Vehicles Act came into force, over 3,900 fines were issued. Out of these, 557 were for dangerous driving, 45 were for drink driving, 207 for jumping red light, 195 fines for driving without seat belt and 336 for riding two wheelers without helmets.

All of these fines were court challans, the official said. The department is waiting for a notification from the Delhi government on ‘compounding challans’, which will provide details of offences where the traffic police will be able to settle fines on-the-spot.

Transport minister Kailash Gahlot on Monday held the first consultation meeting with stakeholders to decide the penalty amounts for compoundable traffic offences. In the meeting, senior officials of the traffic police submitted their recommendations on the prescribed fee.

“In the meeting, the traffic police suggested that the compounding fee should be the maximum of the fine prescribed under new Motor Vehicle Act. For example, if there is fine of up to Rs 10,000 for not having a valid PUC (pollution under control) certificates, traffic police has recommended that the compounding amount should be the maximum rate only, which in this case is Rs 10,000,” said a senior government official on condition of anonymity.

Another official who attended the meeting said that other stakeholders argued that keeping such high compounding rate (on-the-spot payment) could lead to corruption.

“Also, under the new Motor Vehicl Act, most of the penalties have been increased manifold. So, if the compounding fee is also kept so high then it is to be seen how many will be able to pay on the spot as usually, people do not carry a lot of cash,” said the official. On Saturday, the transport minister had said that the Delhi government will hold consultations before notifying the compounding fees. He had also criticised the Centre for issuing the notification of the amended Motor Vehicl Act as late as on August 28 when it was to be implemented from September 1.

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