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Home / Hollywood / From Hamilton to Captain America, here are three films to watch on Fourth of July

From Hamilton to Captain America, here are three films to watch on Fourth of July

This American independence day, here are three recent films to watch on Fourth of July -- one very recent -- that capture the essence of what it means to be free.

hollywood Updated: Jul 04, 2020 07:22 IST
HT Entertainment Desk
HT Entertainment Desk
Hindustan Times
Lin-Manuel Miranda in  Hamilton and Chris Evans in Captain America: The First Avenger.
Lin-Manuel Miranda in Hamilton and Chris Evans in Captain America: The First Avenger.

Fourth of July weekend in 2020 is going to be the most unusual, in terms of moviegoing, that we’ve likely witnessed. For instance, whatever little moviegoing there is will be restricted to drive-in theatres and illegal screenings in basements. A day that is synonymous with Hollywood blockbusters will now be spent at home.

But that shouldn’t take away from the spirit of independence, which can be celebrated anywhere. Here are three recent films -- one very recent -- that capture the essence of independence in 2020.

Hamilton

Hindustantimes

It’s no coincidence that Disney chose to release the filmed version of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s massively popular musical, Hamilton, on the Fourth of July weekend. It’s a date that would normally be reserved for the biggest blockbuster of the summer movie season. But Disney knows the importance of Hamilton, a story about the hands that build America; the studio paid a record-breaking $75 million to acquire its rights, beating out the likes of Netflix and Warner Bros. Then CEO Bob Iger is reported to have paid a personal visit to the producers. The story, about immigrants, inclusivity, and the literal independence of the United States, couldn’t have been more timely.

Also read: Hamilton movie review: Disney+Hotstar gives you a front row seat to history; don’t squander it

The Post

Hindustantimes

Sometimes, the act of nationalism can manifest in the simple idea of brave men and women standing up for their rights. Steven Spielberg’s riveting The Post tells the story of one such occasion, when newspaper editor Ben Bradlee and his publisher Katharine Graham took on the Richard Nixon administration, in direct defiance of their advisors, and at great personal and professional risk.

Captain America: The First Avenger

Hindustantimes

It’s important to remember that Steve Rogers, despite the nationalistic iconography of Captain America, positively detested being a mascot and a political pawn. He was simply a product of his divisive times - and we certainly can’t argue with that. With hyper nationalism and right wing thought at an all-time peak, perhaps at its highest since the Second World War of The First Avenger, we realise what a powerful political tool a man dressed in star spangled red and blue can be. Perhaps the most irrefutable proof of Steve’s neutrality comes in when he is asked by Dr Abraham Erskine, “Do you want to kill Nazis?” To which Steve replies, “I don’t want to kill anyone. I don’t like bullies; I don’t care where they’re from.”

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