A woman being vaccinated against Covid-19 at Sector 30 district hospital, in Noida on September 9. (HT file)
A woman being vaccinated against Covid-19 at Sector 30 district hospital, in Noida on September 9. (HT file)

India has administered at least 750 million Covid vaccine doses till now

By 5.30pm on Monday, 751,041,391 vaccine doses were given across the states and UTs. As many as 6,704,768 doses were administered on the day. In the 18-45 age group, 302,612,416 people have been given the first dose while 45,287,346 have got their second shot as well
By HT Correspondent
UPDATED ON SEP 14, 2021 09:45 AM IST

India had administered at least 750 million Covid vaccine doses by Monday, September 13. By the day, the Centre has provided 727,048,325 vaccine doses to the states and Union Territories. Another 825,000 doses are in the pipeline. As many as 49,036,525 balance and unutilised doses were still available with states and UTs as on Monday morning.

Meanwhile, by 5.30pm on Monday, 751,041,391 vaccine doses were given across the states and UTs. As many as 6,704,768 doses were administered on the day.

In the 18-45 age group, 302,612,416 people have been given the first dose while 45,287,346 have got their second shot as well.

Also Read | Wearing masks not going away for some time: Dr VK Paul

Among the healthcare workers, 10,364,684 have been given the first dose while 8,611,479 have got their second dose as well. Among the frontline workers, 18,338,713 have got their first dose and 14,101,351 have got their second dose too.

On Tuesday, India reported 25,404 new cases in the last 24 hours. The country’s total cases reached 33.29 million, and the death toll reached 443,213, as per the health ministry.

Meanwhile a report published in Lancet has said that there is currently no need for a booster dose against Covid in fully inoculated individuals as they continue to be protected even against hospitalisation and death even from the Delta variant, said a review of current evidences. It added that the available vaccine supply will save far more lives if given to those who haven’t been vaccinated at all.

“The limited supply of these vaccines will save the most lives if made available to people who are at appreciable risk of serious disease and have not yet received any vaccine. Even if some gain can ultimately be obtained from boosting, it will not outweigh the benefits of providing initial protection to the unvaccinated,” said the report, co-authored by WHO chief scientist Soumya Swaminathan, published in Lancet on Monday.

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