Corps of Signals celebrates Raising Day | india | Hindustan Times
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Corps of Signals celebrates Raising Day

THE CORPS of Signals celebrated its 96th anniversary on February 15. The record of Signals Service in India goes as far back as 1857 when it formed a part of the Sappers and Miners. February 15, 1911 has been accepted as the official birthday of the Corps because the first Divisional Signal Company of Sappers and Miners were raised on that day.

india Updated: Feb 20, 2006 11:13 IST
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THE CORPS of Signals celebrated its 96th anniversary on February 15. The record of Signals Service in India goes as far back as 1857 when it formed a part of the Sappers and Miners. February 15, 1911 has been accepted as the official birthday of the Corps because the first Divisional Signal Company of Sappers and Miners were raised on that day.

Signals are essentially the nerves of the army. The nerves in our body connect the brain to the sensory organs and also to the limbs. In the same manner, the generals, being the brains of the army, receive inputs from the troops in contact and from other sources through the Signals.

These inputs are processed at the Headquarters and converted into action plans. It again falls on the Signals to convey these operational plans to the troops who are to execute them. Feedback on execution gets conveyed back and the battle progresses.

It is, therefore, obvious that the Signals are intimately intertwined in all aspects of the functioning of the army both in war and in peace. Signals are present at all levels and at all places, just as we have nerves Signals have gone through a process of evolution in keeping with evolution of communication technology.

The earliest method of signaling was through sight and sound. Primitive men discovered that the sound of drum and bell carried much farther than human voice. Conch shells have also been used in ancient times.

To extend the reach further, man switched to visual signals in the form of smoke by day and fire signals by night. The use of flags and semaphores can also rightly be placed in this category and these are still used albeit ceremoniously by the navies of the world. The heliograph and the signaling lamp were also used. The use of carrier pigeons and other innovative techniques have marked the development and growth of the Signals.

The Corps of Signals has evolved drills and procedures that ensure the provision of reliable and responsive communications to the army under harsh terrain and tough battle field conditions – living up to the motto of the Corps – “TEEVRA CHAUKAS” or “Swift and Secure”.

The Corps of Signals has the privilege of being the EW (Electronic Warfare) arm of the Indian Army with a vast array of computerised /automated state-of-art systems. It is also well poised to exploit the modern communication techniques for meeting the requirements of the Indian Army of the 21st century.

Some of the areas where the Corps is already in the process of exploiting are the Cellular Radio (both GSM &CDMA), WLL, mobile trunked radio, mobile satellite systems, OFC and so on. Advanced data transmission techniques such as SDH and PDH are also being used.

Annual ex-servicemen rally
The third annual ex-Servicemen rally, organised by the Headquarter Bhopal Sub Area, was held on February 19, 2006 at Chakra Park, Sultania Infantry Lines, Bhopal. Stalls by Ex-servicemen Contributory Health Scheme, Recruiting Organisation, Zila Sainik Board, Military Hospital and Dental Centre were set for the ex-servicemen of Madhya Pradesh.

All ex-servicemen were medically examined as per their requirements. Their problems were addressed by the Sub Area Commander Brig V S Bhide, SM. Approximately four hundred plus ex-servicemen from all over MP attended the event, among the most prominent were Gen Kumar, President Ex-Servicemen League, Sehore, Brig KP Pande and Zila Sainik Adhikari Lt Col Dixit. The rally was followed by cultural event and lunch. This event gives an opportunity to all ex-servicemen to meet and put forward their problems.

Did you know?
When using a pointer, one should use the hand closer to the map/chart (see BBC Weather) and point only to that which is meant to be seen by your audience. Do not cover up the material with the pointer.

Return the pointer to your side when not in use and keep it still. Do not distract your audience by continuously moving it. Do not look at the pointer/ map/ chart but concentrate on your audience. Do speak to the audience and not into the map/chart.