'Goldfinger' Samresh is back | india | Hindustan Times
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'Goldfinger' Samresh is back

Simplicity is his forte and the man, who shot one gold after another at the Melbourne Commonwealth Games, touched down on Friday night without even his well wishers and the media getting any wind of it.

india Updated: Apr 02, 2006 01:16 IST

Simplicity is his forte and the man, who shot one gold after another at the Melbourne Commonwealth Games, touched down on Friday night without even his well wishers and the media getting any wind of it.

Samresh Jung dug so much gold at the Games that he left only the baser medals for the others to take away in shooting, but the reticent Delhi marksman, who has always shrugged limelight, was humble as ever despite hitting a goldmine.

He did not want the shimmer of his five gold medals to put into shade the performance of his fellow shooters.

“The reason why I staged a quite entry was because I did not want all the limelight on me … it would not have been fair on fellow shooters who also performed remarkably well,” said Samresh and added, “I was not the only person in the team and we were all together in success and disappointment.”

When asked which of the five gold he won at the Games was more dear to him, the 36-year-old Delhi marksman said: “All the medals are at par … nothing was won easily; it was a tough field and every gold I won is as good as the other,” said Jung who returned late on Friday night along with his wife Anuja, Anjali Bhagwat, Tejaswani Sawant and Deepali Deshpande.

For Samresh, it would only be a small break after a month-long grind at Melbourne and Guangzhou, as he will be off to Jalandhar to participate in the Masters Championships. “On April 6, I am leaving for the Masters in Jalandhar which will also double up as a selection trail for other international championships this year.”

Samresh said the only disappointment was his missing a standard pistol medal. “I am sure I could have won gold in the event but the malfunction in my pistol put paid to my hopes. As for my (none-too-impressive) performance in centre-fire, well I don’t train much in the event but I still shot a decent score,” he said.

On whether he was disappointed at missing out on equalling the Commonwealth Games record of six gold by an individual set by legendary swimmer, Australia’s Ian Thorpe, Samresh only said in his casual, detached manner: “I didn’t know about it … I was only concentrating on my shooting. It doesn’t make much of a difference to me.”

Samresh attributed his poor performance at the ISSF World Cup in Guangzhou -- which was held immediately after the Games -- to fatigue. “After shooting in 12 events at the Games, I was simply too tired … I am shooting world class scores and if I missed out on an Olympic quota place in Guangzhou it will come somewhere else … The only thing is I have to shoot them (scores) at the right place and at the right time.”

His message to the Indians who have followed his success all through the fortnight-long Games?

“Thank you for your wishes.”

For Samresh, who won the David Dickson Award for the Best Athlete at the Games -- but could not collect it as he was off to Guangzhou for the World Cup -- it’s only a matter of time before he qualifies for the Beijing Olympics. For, he’s a picture of perseverance and hard work. And hard work always pays.