ICC shelves reports on alleged corruption | india | Hindustan Times
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ICC shelves reports on alleged corruption

The ICC has shelved reports on alleged corruption involving West Indies' batsman Brian Lara, former Pakistan all rounder Asif Iqbal and the annual Sharjah one-day tournament.

india Updated: Mar 22, 2003 23:28 IST
PTI

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has shelved reports on alleged corruption involving West Indies' batsman Brian Lara, former Pakistan all rounder Asif Iqbal and the annual Sharjah one-day tournament.

ICC president Malcolm Gray told a news conference on the eve of the World Cup final on Saturday that the executive board had considered three separate reports but decided to take no further action.

"What the board did decide was to accept the reports and virtually draw a line under any further investigations," he said.

"In most of those cases we cannot take matters any further, or if we did it would cost us enormous amounts of money and we would probably not get very much further. Also it's because we believe now we should look forward rather than look back."

Lara was one of nine non-Indian test players mentioned in a submission to Indian police by Indian bookmaker M.K. Gupta who said he had offered them money for information. Lara has denied the allegations.

Asif has been involved in organising the Sharjah tournament, which has been investigated by the ICC's Anti-Corruption Unit (ACU) after allegations of match-fixing.

Gray said the decision not to take any further action did not amount to "a blanket exoneration" and ICC chief executive Malcolm Speed said the ACU still had an annual budget of $1 million.

Gray added that three years ago he had said the game was "on its knees" after a corruption scandal which exploded when the late South Africa captain Hansie Cronje admitted taking money from bookmakers for information. Cronje and two other international captains, Salim Malik of Pakistan and Mohammad Azharuddin from India, were subsequently banned for life.

"In a relatively short time we can now say the game is corruption free," he said.

Gray said that the head of the ACU Paul Condon had reported that the World Cup had been free of corruption.

The ACU drew up a list of about 100 people who would be barred from South Africa if they tried to enter the country during the six-week tournament.

Former British police officer Condon was appointed as director of the ACU as a result of the corruption scandal.