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NRI's race discrimination case dismissed

A case filed by a scientist of Indian origin alleging he was rejected for a post because he was Asian has been dismissed.

india Updated: Oct 22, 2005 14:18 IST

A case filed by a scientist of Indian origin alleging he was rejected for a post because he was Asian has been dismissed.

Prim Singh, 45, a molecular biologist, claimed that he was deliberately overlooked for the post of director of the world famous Babraham Institute based in Cambridge.

The Bristol Employment Tribunal dismissed his case, ruling that he "never had any real chance" of success as he did not meet any of the six criteria in the job description.

Singh had sought one million pounds in damages from the institute.

He had also alleged that Ian Wilmut - the celebrated creator of Dolly the Sheep - had bullied him, was racist and had stolen his scientific ideas while the two worked at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh.

Singh alleged that he was the victim of a witch-hunt and was forced out of a 40,000-pounds-a-year job at Roslin.

He then applied for a job at the Babraham Institute but said because of his previous complaints against Roslin he was deliberately overlooked for the job despite being better qualified than several other candidates.

Monica Winstanley, a spokesperson for the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council that is fighting the case for the Babraham Institute, said: "We strongly refute the allegations made by Singh.

"Our recruitment procedures are conducted by experienced professionals who adhere to nationally recognised guidelines and we stand by them."

Singh, a father of three, was born in India, and graduated with a first-class honours degree in physiology biochemistry from Reading University. He gained a PhD from Cambridge University for his research in genetics and worked for the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council for 18 years, five of which were at Roslin.

Singh now works for Germany's Leibniz Institute.

First Published: Oct 22, 2005 13:27 IST