Ponting's code of conduct for his hitmen | india | Hindustan Times
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Ponting's code of conduct for his hitmen

Ponting does not like bad behaviour. Even from his hitmen! Naturally, he has taken Lee and McGrath to task.

india Updated: Jan 06, 2006 19:32 IST

Skipper Ricky Ponting has admonished his two fast bowlers Glenn McGrath and Brett Lee for being reported on misconduct charges during the feisty final cricket Test against South Africa at the Sydney Cricket Ground.

McGrath was officially reprimanded by ICC match referee Chris Broad for using obscene language and Lee was also officially reprimanded for showing dissent.

Ponting, who has worked hard to improve Australia's on-field behaviour during his time as captain, said it was "not acceptable" to have the players appearing before a disciplinary hearing to defend their conduct.

"It's obviously not ideal. It's not anything any of those guys or I as captain are proud of that's for sure," Ponting told reporters after Australia's eight-wicket Sydney Test victory Friday to claim the three-match series 2-0.

"We have worked hard on it over the last couple of years and the guys really pride themselves on what they've done over the last couple of years."

Ponting said frustration was at the heart of the disciplinary break-down amid widespread criticism of the performance of match umpires Billy Bowden and Aleem Dar.

"Frustration is the big thing that comes into it. A lot of it is game-related and happens in the heat of battle on the field. A lot of the guys are quite tired at the moment as well," Ponting said.

"It's something we have to look at and talk about there's no doubt about that.

"As I've always said it's not acceptable that we have guys up on report. You'd like to think that that won't happen again."

South African team coach Mickey Arthur was also hauled before the match referee but was found not guilty of making public criticism of the umpires at a press conference during the Test.

It was a fiercely-contested match and the umpires had to intervene at one stage on Friday when Australian opening batsman Justin Langer and South African wicketkeeper Mark Boucher exchanged words in the second over of the Australian second innings, with stump microphones picking up some spicy sledging between the pair.