?UGC, AICTE are no good? | india | Hindustan Times
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?UGC, AICTE are no good?

THE VICE-CHANCELLOR of Amity University, UP lashed out at the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) and University Grants Commission (UGC) while making a passionate plea for allowing more participation of private players in the higher education sector.

india Updated: Mar 13, 2006 01:20 IST

THE VICE-CHANCELLOR of Amity University, UP lashed out at the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) and University Grants Commission (UGC) while making a passionate plea for allowing more participation of private players in the higher education sector.

The V-C Maj Gen (retd) K J Singh, while speaking as the chief guest at the Club of Lucknow meeting on “Higher Education: perspective and reforms” at PICUP auditorium on Saturday night felt that the regulatory bodies like AICTE and UGC have done precious little for education.

What’s more the V-C stunned everyone into silence by his observation that ever since UGC and AICTE came into existence in 1956 and 1987 respectively, the standard of education in various varsities has gone down.

“Facts speak for themselves. Before these bodies came into being we had several world-class varsities like Allahabad University etc. Now, can you name a single varsity having a respectable rank in the comity of global varsities,” he asked.

Saying that other than giving approvals to run courses and institutions, giving grants, issuing NOCs and whole lot of other things there is little else that these bodies do, he felt that bureaucratic and political intervention in the field of higher education was ruining matters further. “Private players need support. Unless you make things easier for them they would not come in the education sector,” the V-C said.

“Good education would cost good money,” Maj Gen Singh said, adding, “Fee increase is resisted more by regulatory bodies than the actual users”. He asked, “why would a private education provider come in education sector if there is no margin of profit in it for him? You have to differentiate between a Maruti 800 and Mercedes.”

Claiming that the number of foreign students studying in Indian universities was steadily dropping because of increasing political/bureaucratic control and far too many regulations, the V-C said that there were far too many “bodies governing virtually everything related to education.”

He said that presently there were only “nine private varsities in the country including Amity. The need is far more private participation in education.”
Agreeing that those who misuse the “autonomy” should be punished, the V-C made a strong case for supporting and nurturing private education concept in India on the lines of the one in US.

The V-C’s observation drew considerable heat among his audience that included the UP Chief secretary, R Ramani, DG of Amity Lucknow campus, Maj Gen KK Ohri, Deputy director, Naresh Chandra, head of mass communications department of Amity, Anita Gautam, chief PRO Ashutosh Chaubey, secretary of Club of Lucknow RN Bhargava among a host of other bureaucrats, senior journalists and other eminent people.

Chief secretary later expressed serious concern over the increasing business orientation and stressed the need for adopting “service approach” in the higher education sector. “The business approach would ruin the higher education set up and many students would be devoid of education if the approach was not changed,” he felt.