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Alwar killing: Victim’s family alleges 2 companions not telling ‘whole truth’

Pointing out inconsistencies in statements of two men travelling with Ummar Mohammed, his family seeks a ‘fair’ probe in the case.

jaipur Updated: Nov 13, 2017 21:55 IST
Deep Mukherjee
Deceased Ummar Mohammed’s brother Khurshid (in orange shirt) with other family members.
Deceased Ummar Mohammed’s brother Khurshid (in orange shirt) with other family members. (Deep Mukherjee/HT Photo)

The family of 35-year-old Ummar Mohammed, who was found dead on the railway tracks in Alwar on Friday, has alleged that the two men, who were travelling with him, are not giving the complete picture on the sequence of events leading to Mohammed’s death.

“We think that Tahir Khan and (Javed Khan) Jabba are not telling the whole truth. There are several discrepancies in their statements. We don’t know who killed my brother but there is a need for a fair probe,” Khurshid, brother of Ummar Mohammed, told HT on Monday.

According to the Alwar police, Mohammed along with two other companions - Khan and Jabba- were allegedly attacked by ‘anti-social’ elements on November 10 as they were transporting bovines from Alwar to their village Ghat Mika in Bharatpur.

Taher Khan, who sustained a bullet injury, with Jabba in Nuh district of Haryana. (Deep Mukherjee/HT Photo)

The body of Mohammed was found on the railway tracks in Ramgarh, around 15 kilometre away from the place where their pickup van was allegedly attacked. Khan sustained bullet injuries while Jabba managed to escape and return to their village unhurt.

Speaking to HT, the family of Mohammed raised doubts about the statements given by the two.

“When Khan and Jabba returned to the village, we asked them about my brother’s whereabouts. They couldn’t give a satisfactory answer and said he will return soon. Now, they are constantly changing their statements,” said Khurshid.

Khan, the man who sustained bullet injuries in the alleged attack, however, told HT that a group of around seven people attacked their pickup van.

“We had gone to a place near Dausa to buy cows for dairy farming. A group of 6-7 men opened fire at us near Govind Garh when we were returning. One of them was wearing a belt of bullets around his shoulder,” said Khan.

“I sustained bullet injuries on my shoulder while Jabba (who was driving the van) managed to escape. I was lying in the field when one of them hit me with the rear of a gun. Another man then said, ‘Rakesh, he is dead’. They then left me,” Khan said.

He added the men shot Mohammed dead.

Khan said that after regaining consciousness he somehow managed to walk away from the place and return to his village, which is 50 kilometres away from Govind Garh. “I took a lift on a motorbike and called a relative,” he said.

Jabba seconded his claim and said as soon as the firing began, he jumped from the vehicles and fled.

“We think that the men wanted to rob us and sell the cows. We don’t know who they were as they started firing before we could do anything,” said Jabba.

Both Khan and Jabba said they didn’t know whether the men were associated with any cow vigilante group.

The police, however, said they were looking into Khan and Jabba antecedents and that the former had a criminal record.

“We are looking at both of them and will be able to determine what really happened only after questioning them,” said Anil Beniwal, assistant superintendent of police, Alwar (South). “Khan has previous cases of cow smuggling and cases under the Excise Act registered against him. We have detained a suspect in the attack on the pickup and are interrogating the person.”

But Mohammed’s family is not buying Khan and Jabba’s version of events.

“If the murderers dumped my brother’s body on the railway tracks to destroy evidence, why would they leave Khan behind assuming he was dead? Why didn’t they dump him on the railway tracks as well? Was he their relative?” asked Khurshid.

He said that if his brother had died in the pickup truck after being shot, there should have been bloodstains. “When we saw the damaged vehicle in Alwar, there were no blood stains,” Khurshid said.

Mushtaq, the 18-year-old son of Mohammed, said that he had called his father on Friday midnight on his mobile and heard the three men ‘disagreeing’ about the route they were supposed to take.

“My father said that he will come home by morning. I heard him say that they were taking a particular route while one of the other two men disagreed and wanted to take another route. That was the last time we heard from my father,” said Mushtaq.

Khurshid, however, clarified that they were not holding the two men responsible for his brother’s death but wanted a “fair investigation”.

The questions being raised by Ummar Mohammed’s family

Why did the attackers leave behind Tahir Khan assuming he is dead but dumped Ummar Mohammed’s body on the railway tracks?

After returning to the village, Khan and Jabba didn’t give a satisfactory answer about Mohammed’s whereabouts and allegedly evaded questions.

What was the disagreement on the return routes about which Mohammed’s son had heard while speaking to his father for the last time?

Mohammed’s brother said that when he saw the pickup vehicle in Alwar, there was no blood in it which is unlikely if Mohammed had been shot dead inside it.