International Sufi conference in Makanpur from February 2 | lucknow | Hindustan Times
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International Sufi conference in Makanpur from February 2

Mystics and scholars from across the globe will assemble at the headquarters of Madariya Sufi Order in Makanpur Sharif to deliberate on how Sufism could be used as an effective tool to diffuse terrorism and communalism.

lucknow Updated: Jan 25, 2018 14:22 IST
HT Correspondent
Ethos of Sufism was egalitarian, charitable and friendly, often propagated by wandering seers and storytellers.
Ethos of Sufism was egalitarian, charitable and friendly, often propagated by wandering seers and storytellers.(Representative image)

Mystics and scholars from across the globe will assemble at the headquarters of Madariya Sufi Order in Makanpur Sharif to deliberate on how Sufism could be used as an effective tool to diffuse terrorism and communalism .

Disclosing this at a press conference, director, Madariya Sufi Foundation, Mumbai, Sameer Madarvi, Sajjada Nasheen Dargah, Hazrat Badiuddin Zinda Shah Madar, Syed Mahzar Ali, heritage management expert, Dr Mazhar Naqvi and eminent Sufi poet Shajar Madarvi said that discussions will take place at a two-day international conference at Makanpur( about 60 Kms from Kanpur) starting February 2.

Dr Kennith Robbins (USA), Dr Ute Falasch (Germany), Sufi Mehdood Chishti (Afghanistan), Hasan Mian Jetham (South Africa), Mr Renzu Shah (Kashmir), Mr Biman Nath (Bengaluru), Dr Anand Bhattacharya (Kolkata) and delegates from Sri Lanka and Bangladesh have confirmed their participation in the conference, they said, adding that world famous calligraphist of Iran Culture Centre Ghaus Ali will also exhibit his work some rare Islamic artefacts .

Dr Anand Bhattacharya’s book ‘Fakir Sanyasi Rebellion’ will also be launched on the occasion.

The organisers said that ethos of Sufism was egalitarian, charitable and friendly, often propagated by wandering seers and storytellers. It blended with the local culture and cemented Islam. Shrines of Sufis still attract thousands of devotees. Yet terrorist outfits have of late repeatedly tried to destroy Sufi shrines and also their message of love and peace by developing a new form of ‘religion’ based on misinterpretation of the teachings of holy Quran.

They said Sufism needs to be harnessed to fight such outfits through propagation of the underlying values of Sufism — love, harmony and beauty. The conference also aimed at creating awareness about life and works of Shah Madar and contribution of his followers in India’s freedom struggle.