No avenues for higher studies in UP, say ISC toppers | lucknow | Hindustan Times
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No avenues for higher studies in UP, say ISC toppers

Students’ view: Lack of placements and quality teaching grey areas of the system in the state capital

lucknow Updated: May 23, 2018 12:33 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, Lucknow
No avenues,Uttar Pradesh,ISC toppers
(L-R) Fiza Khan, Anandi Arjun, Radhika Chandra, Anmol Srivasav, Isha Bhasin and Saman Waheed at HT Lucknow office.(HT Photo)

There are no avenues for higher studies in UP. As a result, Class 12 passouts from Lucknow are compelled to pursue graduation, post graduation and specialisation courses in institutions away from their home state.

“In terms of standard of education, colleges in the state are not at par with those elsewhere. It wasn’t out of choice, but due to compulsion we took admission to colleges of Delhi, Mumbai and other cities,” said a few national rank holders in the ISC exam during a forum organised by Hindustan Times, Lucknow.

To recall, Lucknow students had dominated the ISC Class 12 merit list in a big way. Out of top 49 students who made it to top 3 positions, 18 of them were from Lucknow.

“There is no quality education. Though some colleges in UP rank among top 20 colleges in the country, they fail to provide us the required exposure,” said Fiza Khan, who passed out from Seth MR Jaipuria School with 99.25% and jointly shared the second rank in the country with 16 others.

The students lamented lower standards of education due to lack of teachers’ efforts. “There are 150-plus colleges affiliated to the Lucknow University in the city and the teachers do not even turn up for lectures. LU should look into this. Any college can become a good institution with good teachers,” said Saman Waheed, a national topper (99.5%) who studied at City Montessori School, Lucknow.

“Colleges in Lucknow cannot match the standards of education in other metropolitan cities like Delhi, Mumbai etc,” said Anandi Arjun who passed out from La Martiniere Girls’ College with 99% and was third rank holder in the country with 24 others. She wants to pursue Economic honours from these cities.

The students said lack of placements, quality teaching and practical application remained the grey areas of higher education in the state capital. “If all these aspects of education are improved, then why not?” said Isha Bhasin, ISC third rank holder, on the question of pursuing higher education from Lucknow. She brought laurels to La Martiniere Girls’ College from where she passed out.

For medical profession, Uttar Pradesh has a greater prospect to practice Medicine. “Uttar Pradesh is fairly on the right track with greater influx because of the high population as students practical learning experience,” said national topper, Radhika Chandra of CMS who aspires to become a doctor following her parent’s footsteps. AIIMS is her first priority.

Anmol Srivastava of CMS (Kanpur road branch) who scored 98.25% wishes to pursue Bachelors of Technology in computer science. He said, “I am all set to make my father’s dream come true.” The boy is looking forward to crack the IIT test and opt for computer science.

Ironically, this Lucknow boy lost his father on the day of his ISC mathematics exam, but his strong determination made him score 100 in the subject.

“Initially, I couldn’t write…my body was trembling and I couldn’t stop crying. The entire sheet was soiled by my tears,” said Anmol, recalling that day.

He said staying away from Lucknow will be a new experience.

The students had a zealous attitude about stepping outside school life and entering the real world.

“It’s the first time I’ll be out of the protected environment,” said Anmol.

“It gives me a sense of independence and an opportunity to explore the world,” said Radhika, expressing her views on commencing her college life.

It is said that politics play a vital role in nation building. But, the students view it as a dirty game and don’t want to get involved in it.

“Politics doesn’t interest me. It’s dirty in the present scenario and I don’t want to get involved in it. I just want to do my part as a responsible citizen and serve my country,” said Fiza, who wishes to pursue psychology honours from Delhi University. Others echoed similar views and refused to walk the road of politics. But they wanted to serve their country in one way or the other.

The students didn’t quite agree with the thought that meritorious students were usually bookworms. Isha Bhasin and Anandi were of the view that their efforts and results were driven by the passion for their subjects. “Staying focused during study hour is important. We never studied round the clock,” they said.

Not just in the science stream, some students also achieved record breaking scores in Humanities and they wish to pursue their higher education in these subjects.

“It’s not difficult to score well if you love the subject,” said Anandi Arjun, a humanities student (99%) from LMGC. Isha Bhasin, another humanities student of the college scored 99% and wants take up political Science and international relations.

With a noble thought of serving people in remote areas, Radhika wants to become a doctor. Fiza Khan (99.25%), another humanities student with a flair for writing, wants to study psychology.

On queries about what lacked in the content of newspapers today, the students hesitantly told journalists that the front page should carry more positive content which inspires the readers. “Three things that a newspaper should focus more upon are inspiring story, development story and content about people working for the betterment of the country so that others can take inspiration from it,” said Lucknow-based ISC topper Anmol Srivastava.

“All I see is rape, murder and crime reports on the front page. There should be positive and inspirational stories on the first page and crime reports can appear in the other pages,” said Fiza who wishes to be a journalist at some point in life.

“I want to read something that benefits me and that can be useful in my daily life,” said Radhika Chandra who also has passion for writing. “Newspapers should avoid bias and junkie entertainment stories,” said Anandi Arjun. Similarly, Isha Bhasin suggested that media should be neutral and creative.

SOCIETY NEEDS TO CHANGE

“The society has barriers like class distinction which hinder the growth of people. People seem to be obsessed with English,” said Fiza Khan.

“Corruption and poverty are issues of concern. The famous quote ‘The poor get poorer and the rich get richer’ befits our society at present. India has a long way to be a developed country. I definitely want to do something about this,” said Anmol.

Isha Bhasin addressed the issue of environment degradation and status of women in the society whereas Saman expressed concern over the illiteracy rate.

POLITICS NOT THEIR CUP OF TEA

It is said that politics play a vital role in nation building. But, the students view it as a dirty game and don’t want to get involved in it.

“Politics doesn’t interest me. It’s dirty in the present scenario and I don’t want to get involved in it. I just want to do my part as a responsible citizen and serve my country,” said Fiza.

STUDIES ARE FUN, NOT STRESS

The students didn’t quite agree with the thought that meritorious students were usually bookworms. Isha Bhasin and Anandi were of the view that their efforts and results were driven by the passion for their subjects. “Staying focused during study hour is important. We never studied round the clock,” they said.

POLEMIC AGAINST MEDIA

On queries about what lacked in the content of newspapers today, the students hesitantly said that the front page should carry more positive content which inspires the readers.

“Three things that a newspaper should focus more upon are inspiring story, development story and content about people working for the betterment of the country so that others can take inspiration from it,” said Lucknow-based ISC topper Anmol Srivastava