DSC Prize winner Anuradha Roy’s next is a gripping tale of India in 21st century | more lifestyle | Hindustan Times
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DSC Prize winner Anuradha Roy’s next is a gripping tale of India in 21st century

The novel will span India’s 20th century from the 1930s through Independence to the 1990s.

more lifestyle Updated: Oct 14, 2017 16:15 IST
“All The Lives We Never Lived” is the story of Myshkin and his mother Gayatri, a rebellious, alluring artist-heroine who is driven to abandon home and marriage and follow her primal instinct for freedom.
“All The Lives We Never Lived” is the story of Myshkin and his mother Gayatri, a rebellious, alluring artist-heroine who is driven to abandon home and marriage and follow her primal instinct for freedom.(HT Photo)

Author Anuradha Roy, winner of the DSC Prize, will come out with her next book in June 2018 and the novel will span India’s 20th century from the 1930s through Independence to the 1990s. Titled “All The Lives We Never Lived”, the book will be published by Hachette India.

“All The Lives We Never Lived” is the story of Myshkin and his mother Gayatri, a rebellious, alluring artist-heroine who is driven to abandon home and marriage and follow her primal instinct for freedom. Freedom of another kind is in the air across all of India, and in Germany the Nazis have come to power. At this point of crisis, a German artist from Gayatri’s past seeks her out. His arrival ignites passions she has long been forced to suppress.

What follows is Gayatri’s life as pieced together by her son, a journey that takes him through India and Dutch-held Bali. Excavating the roots of the world in which he was abandoned, he comes to understand the connections between volcanic strife at home and a war-torn universe overtaken by patriotism.

The scale of Anuradha Roy’s novel is matched by its power as a parable for our times, the publisher says. Its depiction of the contrasting ideas of Mahatma Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore, of the limits of nationalism when confronted by cosmopolitanism, makes it a spell-binding saga centred on people trying to make sense of their lives.

Roy’s previous book “Sleeping on Jupiter” was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and won the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature last year. Speaking about the acquisition, Poulomi Chatterjee, Editor-in-Chief of Hachette India, says: “This is a beautifully crafted novel that embodies the restraint that is quintessentially Anuradha -- in its evocation of loss, pain and love.”