Killa review: A delicate theme handled expertly

Among the elements that work best are the nostalgic throwbacks, to Chinmay's first cycle race, dips in a pool with friends, his first tiff with the group. It's easy to relate to these scenes because such moments are universal.
Avinash-Arun-s-Killa-that--received-the-National-Award-for-Best-Feature-Film-in-Marathi--hits-theatres-on-June-26
Avinash-Arun-s-Killa-that--received-the-National-Award-for-Best-Feature-Film-in-Marathi--hits-theatres-on-June-26
Updated on Jun 27, 2015 02:08 PM IST
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Hindustan Times | ByMihir Fadnavis
KILLA

Direction: Avinash Arun

Actors: Archit Deodhar, Amruta Subhash

Rating: 4/5



Avinash Arun's incredible debut film explores unusual themes delicately and expertly -- the frustration of not belonging, the search for home, the weight of loss, the frustrations of single-parenting.



After his father's death, 11-year-old Chinmay (played by Archit Deodhar) moves from Pune to a Konkan village with his mother (played by Amruta Subhash).



Arriving with aching grief for his lost parent and lost home, things takes a turn for the better when Chinmay finds a new group of friends and, after a rough incident, embarks on a journey at a deserted fort.



The killa is clearly a metaphor for Chinmay's mind -- abandoned, desolate, yet stoic in the face of a turbulent sea. The scene where he discovers and explores the fort is rendered in light and shadow, exquisite and unforgettable.







The mother-son equation is rendered beautifully too, with both characters locked in circumstance, unable to discuss their pain. How does a mother explain helplessness, or loneliness? How does a child find closure?



Instead of melodrama, these questions are explored through the nuances of finely crafted performance in . There are no easy answers, just authentic and heartfelt emotion.



Among the elements that work best are the nostalgic throwbacks, to Chinmay's first cycle race, dips in a pool with friends, his first tiff with the group. It's easy to relate to these scenes because such moments are universal.



There's plenty of humour too, thanks to the well-cast goofballs playing Chinmay's friends.



The music, by Naren Chandavarkar and Benedict Taylor, adds an additional tug to the heartstrings.



In one scene, Chinmay sets off in a boat, out to the vastness of the sea, letting his mind slowly still and take in the beauty before him. Viewers of can expect a similar experience.



(This is a Marathi film also being screened with English subtitles.)
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