Divers access grounded floatel four days after it tilted at Mahim Bay | mumbai news | Hindustan Times
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Divers access grounded floatel four days after it tilted at Mahim Bay

The owners of Arc Deck Bar have also hired a firm to assist SMIT in their salvaging operations

mumbai Updated: May 31, 2018 00:44 IST
Arc Deck floating restaurant
Arc Deck floating restaurant(HT Photo)

Four days after choppy weather foiled attempts to board the ship Avior that capsized near Mahim Bay on Friday, divers from Singapore-based firm SMIT Salvage finally managed to enter the grounded ship that used to host the floating hotel Arc Deck Bar, on Wednesday morning. After a day-long examination, SMIT will now submit a plan of action to Maharashtra Maritime Board (MMB) in order to salvage the ship and bring it back to the harbour. This may take up to a week to be done.

Sanjay Sharma, chief port officer said, “The plan to salvage the ship needs to be approved by the maritime board. SMIT will present their findings from Wednesday’s examination to the board and also discuss their plan to salvage their ship. But they have not yet figured out where the puncture is or how it happened.”

Since Monday morning, divers have been trying to board the grounded ship, but could not approach it due to strong water currents. Divers will examine the ship again on Thursday. Sharma said, “They can only salvage it once they figure out where it is punctured.”

The owners of Arc Deck Bar have also hired a firm to assist SMIT in their salvaging operations. Kookie Singh, one of the co-owners of Arc Deck Bar said, “We have appointed a firm called Global divers, for insurance purposes. SMIT will still lead the operations.”

So far, the divers have considered two methods to stabilise the ship. They plan to plug the puncture to stop water from seeping into the ship, then pump out the water, and tug the ship to the harbour. The other plan involves supporting the ship from one side to balance the tilt, and tugging it to safety. “When SMIT first submitted their plans to us on Tuesday, we approved them, but we have to check which one will be feasible in this case. They cannot carry out the operation without our approval,” Sharma said.