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Five rounds completed, but 76K seats in Mumbai FYJC still up for grabs

Almost 80% are in private colleges; parents blame state’s unchecked nod to new seats.

mumbai Updated: Aug 30, 2018 00:45 IST
Ankita Bhatkhande
Ankita Bhatkhande
Hindustan Times
mumbai,FYJC,college
Applications for students who passed the supplementary exam will begin after September 4. (Representational photo)

Even as the state education department has finished five regular admission rounds for first-year junior colleges (FYJCs), over 76,000 seats across Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR) are still lying vacant. Nearly 80% of the vacant seats are in permanently unaided colleges or in unaided divisions of aided colleges.

While the state education department has, as of now, not announced the number of students who are yet to secure admissions, senior officials in the education department said that the number is estimated to not be more than 5,000, revealing a huge discrepancy between the number of seats and students.

This year, the state education department created 10,000 FYJC seats in Mumbai with 14 new colleges. With the government granting permissions to more divisions and colleges every year, activists have over the last few years raised concerns over the increasing number of seats in private colleges.

In 2017, there were around 55,000 vacant seats across city colleges at the end of over 11 admission rounds. Vaishali Bafna, a member of SYSCOM an education think tank that had written to the government about the vacant seats, said “Every year, hundreds of seats lie vacant as there are no takers. The state education department grants permission to new colleges and divisions without even checking if there is a need for more seats. If the number of applicants is not more than the number of seats, what is the need to grant approvals for more colleges?” said Bafna.

Parents said that with many unaided divisions being granted approvals,students with low scores are often compelled to take admissions to these divisions where they have to shell out fees ranging from ₹6,000 to ₹15,000 depending on the course.

“Colleges are more interested in admitting students under their unaided divisions to get more revenue from fees. With blanket permissions being given to colleges, students and parents are not able to judge the quality of a particular college” said a parent from Mahim.

The Maharashtra State Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education (MSBSHSE) declared the results of the Class 10 supplementary exams on Wednesday. A total of 33,397 students had appeared for the exam, which was conducted in July. Students who have passed the exam will now be allowed to apply in the second FCFS round to begin after September 4.

First Published: Aug 30, 2018 00:34 IST