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Home / Mumbai News / Malavika’s Mumbaistan: What big dimples you have, grandma

Malavika’s Mumbaistan: What big dimples you have, grandma

It was the presence of Tagore’s granddaughter, the young actress Sara Ali Khan, daughter of Saif Ali Khan and Amrita Singh, that had added a certain frisson to the evening, according to sources.

mumbai Updated: Sep 27, 2019, 16:37 IST
Malavika Sangghvi
Malavika Sangghvi
Hindustan Times
Sharmila Tagore and Sara Ali Khan at the Vogue Beauty Awards 2019.
Sharmila Tagore and Sara Ali Khan at the Vogue Beauty Awards 2019.(Vogue)

Standing out gracefully in a sea of red carpet gowns, this Wednesday at the Vogue Beauty Awards, was veteran yesteryear actress Sharmila Tagore, who received the ‘Beauty Legend Award’ at the ceremony that saw the likes of Alia Bhatt (’Beauty Icon’), Kriti Sanon(’Beauty of the Year’), Malaika Arora (’Fitspiration-Female’), Sonali Bendre Behl and Tahira Kashyap Khurrana (’Beauty Warriors’) also being recognised.

But it was the presence of Tagore’s granddaughter, the young actress Sara Ali Khan, daughter of Saif Ali Khan and Amrita Singh, that had added a certain frisson to the evening, according to sources.

“It was for the first time that Tagore and Sara Alia Khan had been spotted together at any public event. Sara received an award for ‘Fresh Face-Female’. And the duo was seen sharing some sweet moments during the ceremony. Later, Sara was overheard saying what a special occasion it had been for her to be there with her grandmother,” said the source, adding, “Sara seems to be following the footsteps of her grandmother, one of the best actors and divas of her era.”

Indeed, pictures from the occasion feature the two beautiful actresses, one who went on to attain iconic status, and the other about to start her own journey up the success ladder. Though through their body language, it does appear that the younger lady, is a tad over-awed.

But then if your grandma happens to be Sharmila Tagore, it’s only natural, we suppose.

Mumbai’s Kohinoor

Boman Kohinoor showing a pic of his meeting Prince William and Kate to Aliya and Zak Kapoor.
Boman Kohinoor showing a pic of his meeting Prince William and Kate to Aliya and Zak Kapoor. ( Karan Kapoor )

Tributes are pouring in for senior partner of the much loved Britannia & Co Restaurant at Ballard Estate, Boman Rashid Kohinoor, who passed away at 97, this Wednesday, at a Mumbai hospital. Kohinoor had endeared himself to generations of patrons who’d visit his establishment, as much for its signature dishes like berry pulao and bun muska, as for its charming owner, an avid fan of the British royals.

As is known, Kohinoor’s ardour had won him a special meet with Prince William and Kate Middleton, during their week-long trip to India, in 2016.

This picture, of the charismatic nonagenarian, with two other visitors from England, with an impressive lineage of their own, was taken earlier this year. Shot by former Mumbai boy Karan Kapoor, erstwhile model and actor, it features his daughter, Aliya, and son, Zak, when they were here on their Easter vacations this April.

Karan Kapoor
Karan Kapoor

“I wanted to show my kids the South Mumbai I grew up with; a bit of the experience I’d had in my late teens and early twenties,” said Kapoor, now an award-winning lensman based in London, when we spoke yesterday. “So it was important to take them for a meal to Britannia. I was so glad to be back, but nothing seemed to have changed since my childhood. Apart, of course, from the fact that Mr Kohinoor had met the royal couple, which he told us about with great delight…” he said. Incidentally, Kapoor tells us that on that visit, Kohinoor had declared that he had every intention of living to 150 ‘to set a record’.

Ninety seven not out is not too bad either, considering how much life Mr Kohinoor had put in to his days.

Tweet Talk:

“If I had Rs1 for each time someone told me a recession is coming: I’d have enough money to survive a recession.”

-Tweeted by comedian Sorabh Pant

To See The Sea

Kabir Bedi with the six children.
Kabir Bedi with the six children.

“The monsoon was sprinkling the beach with warm rain when we finally reached Juhu. We were all very energised by it. Together we walked towards the welcoming roar of waves. The children jumped and squealed as the sea washed over their ankles, again and again. I asked them to taste the salty sea. ‘Khara!’ they exclaimed in surprise. We walked in deeper. They felt the power of the sea as it pulled at them and moved the sand beneath their feet. They laughed and giggled with excitement. It was a whole new experience, far from the distant villages from which they came. It was an unforgettable day.”

So writes actor, presenter, commentator, writer and producer Kabir Bedi about a unique initiative he undertook recently, acting as a tour guide for six visually-challenged children from villages in Jharkhand and Rajasthan, visiting Mumbai for the first time. The trip had been sponsored by Sightsavers India, the NGO which has, he says, provided five million people with free eye operations; 35 million with free eye treatments; and 50,000 truck drivers with free spectacles, and of which he is a brand ambassador. The visit to the Juhu beach, which had been the culmination of the tour, was especially significant for the actor, who had been 14 years of age when he’d had his first experience of the sea at the same beach. It was the same neighbourhood to which he’d return, later, as a young man on the threshold of his professional life, as a resident of one of its nearby building complexes.

“Foaming white waves crashing towards me, washing over my ankles, sand moving stealthily under my feet, gazing in wonder at an endless horizon and a limitless sky. Oh, the vastness of it all! I fell in love with the sea and have loved it ever since,” recalled Bedi about his first encounter. No surprises then that when he’d been asked to give six visually-challenged children their first experience of the same sea, he’d jumped at the idea.

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