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Home / Music / MCAI defends opinion confirming IPL song not plagiarised version of Kr$na’s song

MCAI defends opinion confirming IPL song not plagiarised version of Kr$na’s song

MCAI’s committee members Lalit Pandit and Ravi, confirm issuing an ‘expert opinion’ to composer Pranav Ajayrao Malpe, which according to the association absolves Malpe of copyright violations, levelled against him by Delhi-based rapper Kr$na.

music Updated: Sep 12, 2020 13:29 IST
Samarth Goyal
Samarth Goyal
Hindustan Times
Mumbai, April 06, 2016 : lalit Pandit attended the GiMA Awards in Mumbai. (Freelance photo by Yogen Shah)
Mumbai, April 06, 2016 : lalit Pandit attended the GiMA Awards in Mumbai. (Freelance photo by Yogen Shah)(Yogen Shah)

The Music Composers Association of India has confirmed issuing an opinion to composer Pranav Ajayrao Malpe, who has been accused by rapper Krishna Kaul (Kr$na) of copying the latter’s song,Dekh Kaun Aaya Vapas(2017), clarifying that the upcoming season of IPL 2020, Aayenge Hum Vapas, composed by Pranav Ajayrao Malpe, is not a plagiarised version.

“He (Malpe) reached out to us asking our opinion, whether we thought it was plagiarised or not. We heard both songs, and we don’t think it’s a copy, and that’s what we responded to him. He must be talking about that, when he says he got a certificate from us,” says Ravi, one of the key members of the decision -making committee of this association.

 

For the uninitiated following Kr$na’s initial accusations, Pranav, in an interview had furnished a “certificate” from the MCAI, which based on the “findings of four well known music composers”, clarifies that “there is no similarity between the songs.”

 

Noted music composer Lalit Pandit, who is a member of the decision-making committee, explains the parameters which help their association in forming an opinion on copyright violations and plagiarism. “There are three parameters on which we decide if a song is plagiarised or not. The first is melody, or dhun, as we call it in Hindi. The second is chhand or beat pattern. Third and the final thing is harmony. All three need to be similar, and only if one of them is identical, it does not mean its a copyright violation. Also, to deem a song as plagiarised or copied, the three elements, have to be the same for a minimum of eight bars. Any less than that is not a copyright violation,” he says.

However, Kr$na on Twitter, wrote that the association dismissed any charges of plagiarism, since they feel that plagiarism is permissible because rap songs sound similar.

 

Dismissing Kr$na’s comments, Lalit Pandit says he cannot “ever believe” that any committee member could have said that. “Main maan hi nai sakta hum me se kisi ne aisa bola ho, aur isko, as a reason, diya ho. In case of rap songs, theres no dhun. So then, the rest of the two elements matter. Chhand and harmony. If they are the same, for eight bars, then it’s a copyright violation,” he adds.

The one half of the popular composing duo, Jatin-Lalit, also feels that MCAI’s expert opinion will weigh heavily in favour of Malpe, if Kr$na decides to take matters to the court. “ It’s an expert opinion. I am not sure how much time it will take for the case to last in court, because of the opinion from MCAI,” he signs off.

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