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Noida: Eerie silence reigns in Bisada

Roads and lanes are deserted and a group of people sitting on the verandahs and benches outside some shops show some sign of life in this nondescript village that came into the limelight after the lynching in September 2015.

noida Updated: Sep 28, 2017 14:54 IST
Sohil Sehran
Sohil Sehran
Hindustan Times
Noida,Dadri,Bisada
Villagers said that Hindus have not forgotten the lynching, which they refer to as Ikhlaq Kaand.(Virendra Singh Gosain/HT PHOTO)

An eerie silence prevails in Bisada village even after 17 persons accused of lynching Mohammad Ikhlaq’s are out on bail, two years after the incident. Villagers said they suffered the most and their sentiments were deliberately hurt.

Roads and lanes are deserted and a group of people sitting on the verandahs and benches outside some shops show some sign of life in this nondescript village that came into the limelight after the lynching in September 2015.

However, once the people heard of media persons’ presence in the village, they started gathering around the vehicle with queries. The villagers questioned the presence of the media persons and photojournalists were asked not to click any pictures till they allowed it.

The villagers are of the notion that the media is their enemy number one as it has not left any stone unturned to “malign Bisada and the Hindus living here”. However, they agree to let the reporter make his way after being assured that there would be no attempt to malign any community.

“It has been proved that Ikhlaq had slaughtered a cow. His act had hurt our sentiments and people were enraged. The media and government projected us as the fall guy. Now, journalists visit only to ask about Ikhlaq and his family,” said Sandeep Singh Thakur, a 30-year-old resident of Bisada.

He said that Hindus have not forgotten the lynching, which they refer to as Ikhlaq Kaand. Villagers said that the divide was created by the Muslims, despite the fact that they were always supported by the Hindus, morally and financially.

Gourav, a village youngster, said, “Eighteen people were jailed for no fault of theirs and one of them died in police custody. Most accused were unaware of the incident and they were falsely implicated. They kept languishing in jail for over a year and have been released only now.”

However, in lane number 2 of the village, an altogether different scene is witnessed. Two class 10 girl students — Tanvi (a Hindu) and Shahnaz (a Muslim) — are sitting together in a courtyard.

Tanvi’s house has architecture from the pre-independence era, with huge arches touching the ceiling. As the reporter approaches, she beckons her veil-clad friend Shahnaz to come into the house.

“Tanvi’s family drops me home every day. They treat me as their own daughter. It is my home, where I am loved and cared. Her family has always been supportive of us,” said Shahnaz.

First Published: Sep 28, 2017 14:54 IST