Photos: COVID-19 cases fall in Dharavi; authorities still on alert

Mumbai's Dharavi, one of India’s largest slum clusters, which was a Covid-19 hotspot until recently, has shown signs of flattening the curve. It recorded only five cases on June 23, the lowest in a day since April 10. Due to regular door-to-door screenings to detect symptoms and the sheer hard work of health workers and local authorities, experts believe coronavirus cases are likely to dip in the coming days. Dharavi’s current doubling rate is 78 days, double the average rate of Mumbai, which is around 37 days.

UPDATED ON JUN 27, 2020 11:03 AM IST 7 Photos
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Medical professionals head to conduct door-to-door screening of residents living in Dharavi, Mumbai. With just five cases reported on June 23, and less than 35 cases per day reported throughout June, experts believe Dharavi has flattened the curve, and now likely to show signs of dipping. (Satish Bate / HT Photo)

Medical professionals head to conduct door-to-door screening of residents living in Dharavi, Mumbai. With just five cases reported on June 23, and less than 35 cases per day reported throughout June, experts believe Dharavi has flattened the curve, and now likely to show signs of dipping. (Satish Bate / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON JUN 27, 2020 11:03 AM IST
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Medical professionals wearing PPE overalls take details from a resident during a door-to-door screening in Dharavi. (Satish Bate / HT Photo)

Medical professionals wearing PPE overalls take details from a resident during a door-to-door screening in Dharavi. (Satish Bate / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON JUN 27, 2020 11:03 AM IST
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A deserted view of Dharavi. The cases there had hit a peak at the start of May, with 94 cases recorded in a single day on May 3. The number started plunging since June 1. The highest number of cases in June did not go beyond 34, recorded on June 1, reported HT. (Satish Bate / HT Photo)

A deserted view of Dharavi. The cases there had hit a peak at the start of May, with 94 cases recorded in a single day on May 3. The number started plunging since June 1. The highest number of cases in June did not go beyond 34, recorded on June 1, reported HT. (Satish Bate / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON JUN 27, 2020 11:03 AM IST
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A medical professional collects a swab sample from a woman during a free medical checkup in Dharavi. Around fifty mobile fever clinics in ambulances with a team of medics drive around all day for door-to-door check on residents, detect symptoms or comorbidity, collect swabs from suspects and create general health awareness among the people there, reported IANS. (Rafiq Maqbool / AP)

A medical professional collects a swab sample from a woman during a free medical checkup in Dharavi. Around fifty mobile fever clinics in ambulances with a team of medics drive around all day for door-to-door check on residents, detect symptoms or comorbidity, collect swabs from suspects and create general health awareness among the people there, reported IANS. (Rafiq Maqbool / AP)

UPDATED ON JUN 27, 2020 11:03 AM IST
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Security personnel hold flowers given to them during a free medical camp in Dharavi. Dharavi’s doubling rate has gone up to 78 days, double the Mumbai average of around 37 days, reported IANS. (Rafiq Maqbool / AP)

Security personnel hold flowers given to them during a free medical camp in Dharavi. Dharavi’s doubling rate has gone up to 78 days, double the Mumbai average of around 37 days, reported IANS. (Rafiq Maqbool / AP)

UPDATED ON JUN 27, 2020 11:03 AM IST
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A medical professional wearing PPE coveralls thermal screens a resident in Dharavi. “We have actively followed our model of four Ts – tracing, tracking, testing and treating. Our focus was on treatment and discharge. We took up several other measures like isolating maximum people and door-to-door screening in slums,” Kiran Dighavkar, assistant municipal commissioner of G-North ward (Dharavi), told HT. (Vijayanand Gupta / HT Photo)

A medical professional wearing PPE coveralls thermal screens a resident in Dharavi. “We have actively followed our model of four Ts – tracing, tracking, testing and treating. Our focus was on treatment and discharge. We took up several other measures like isolating maximum people and door-to-door screening in slums,” Kiran Dighavkar, assistant municipal commissioner of G-North ward (Dharavi), told HT. (Vijayanand Gupta / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON JUN 27, 2020 11:03 AM IST
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Health workers rest during a door-to-door screening of people for COVID-19 symptoms in Dharavi. The Dharavi slum is spread over 2.4 sqkm, has 850,000 residents and a population density of 354,167 per square kilometre, making it one of the most cramped spaces in Mumbai, itself the world’s fifth most densely populated city. (Rajanish Kakade / AP)

Health workers rest during a door-to-door screening of people for COVID-19 symptoms in Dharavi. The Dharavi slum is spread over 2.4 sqkm, has 850,000 residents and a population density of 354,167 per square kilometre, making it one of the most cramped spaces in Mumbai, itself the world’s fifth most densely populated city. (Rajanish Kakade / AP)

UPDATED ON JUN 27, 2020 11:03 AM IST
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