Photos: Gandhi’s Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad completes its centenary year

Updated On Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

Mahatma Gandhi’s Ashram in Ahmedabad completed its centenary year on June 17, 2018. The Satyagraha Ashram on the banks of the Sabarmati was founded by Gandhi in 1917 and served as his residence for 13 years. After returning from South Africa, the years saw the Khadi movement, Gandhi’s rising popularity and involvement in politic and his battle against untouchability. Since his death various trustees and descendents of the harijan families who lived here have taken up the task of running and maintaining the ideals that Gandhi lived for. As it completes 100 years of its existence, a look at the role it played in the Mahatma’s life.

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A view of Gandhi’s cottage ‘Hridaykunj’ at Sabarmati Ashram. Founded by Mahatma Gandhi on June 17, 1917, the Ashram served as his residence for approximately 13 years till 1930. In addition to this room, Hridaykunj also comprises Kasturba Gandhi’s room, a guest room, kitchen, store room and verandah. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

A view of Gandhi’s cottage ‘Hridaykunj’ at Sabarmati Ashram. Founded by Mahatma Gandhi on June 17, 1917, the Ashram served as his residence for approximately 13 years till 1930. In addition to this room, Hridaykunj also comprises Kasturba Gandhi’s room, a guest room, kitchen, store room and verandah. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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A tourist meditates in front of Gandhi’s statue at the Ashram Museum. While the heat outside is difficult to bear even for locals, the blistering June weather fails to keep tourists –both national and international –from visiting the Ashram. Atul Pandya, director, Sabarmati Ashram Preservation and Memorial Trust said that there are more than 4,000 visitors, daily. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

A tourist meditates in front of Gandhi’s statue at the Ashram Museum. While the heat outside is difficult to bear even for locals, the blistering June weather fails to keep tourists –both national and international –from visiting the Ashram. Atul Pandya, director, Sabarmati Ashram Preservation and Memorial Trust said that there are more than 4,000 visitors, daily. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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Visitors stroll in the corridors of Hridaykunj. The rest of the Ashram consists of Vinoba-Mira Kutir, a small hut that served as the residence, at different points of Vinoba Bhave and of Madeleine Slade or Mirabehn, daughter of a British rear-admiral, who moved to India and became involved in the country’s freedom struggle. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

Visitors stroll in the corridors of Hridaykunj. The rest of the Ashram consists of Vinoba-Mira Kutir, a small hut that served as the residence, at different points of Vinoba Bhave and of Madeleine Slade or Mirabehn, daughter of a British rear-admiral, who moved to India and became involved in the country’s freedom struggle. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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Vinoba Bhave’s hut at the Ashram. Besides these residency quarters, the Ashram has a guest house that is locked and awaits renovation, Udyog Mandir (where khadi technology had been developed) and the living quarters of Maganlal Gandhi – Gandhi’s nephew, disciple and one-time manager of the Ashram, which has been turned into a Charkha gallery. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

Vinoba Bhave’s hut at the Ashram. Besides these residency quarters, the Ashram has a guest house that is locked and awaits renovation, Udyog Mandir (where khadi technology had been developed) and the living quarters of Maganlal Gandhi – Gandhi’s nephew, disciple and one-time manager of the Ashram, which has been turned into a Charkha gallery. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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A view of Gandhi Ashram Museum in Ahmedabad. The museum, library and exhibition area are later additions by architect Charles Correa, who used brick piers, stone floors and tiled roofs to blend them with the rest of the Ashram. The Ashram’s entrance has book, memorabilia and khadi shops. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

A view of Gandhi Ashram Museum in Ahmedabad. The museum, library and exhibition area are later additions by architect Charles Correa, who used brick piers, stone floors and tiled roofs to blend them with the rest of the Ashram. The Ashram’s entrance has book, memorabilia and khadi shops. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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Satyagrah Ashram in Kochrab. When Gandhi returned to India in 1915, he had already been practising commune living for a while at South Africa. Later that year, Ahmedabad’s Kochrab area saw Gandhi’s first ashram come up. The place was named Satyagraha Ashram and started with about 20 people, a figure that doubled in a few months. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

Satyagrah Ashram in Kochrab. When Gandhi returned to India in 1915, he had already been practising commune living for a while at South Africa. Later that year, Ahmedabad’s Kochrab area saw Gandhi’s first ashram come up. The place was named Satyagraha Ashram and started with about 20 people, a figure that doubled in a few months. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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A view of the interior of the Satyagrah Ashram. A lack of space for some of the activities that Gandhi had planned such as a tannery, agriculture and animal husbandry, the drying up of funds due to initial resistance outside the Ashram and the breakout of plague in Ahmedabad lead to the closure of this Ashram. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

A view of the interior of the Satyagrah Ashram. A lack of space for some of the activities that Gandhi had planned such as a tannery, agriculture and animal husbandry, the drying up of funds due to initial resistance outside the Ashram and the breakout of plague in Ahmedabad lead to the closure of this Ashram. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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Today, Ramesh Bhai (pictured) maintains the Ashram. Before its closure the Ashram was located between a crematorium on one side and a jail on the other, as Gandhi felt that every Satyagraha activist had to go to both places. The Ashram was later shifted to the banks of the river Sabarmati on June 17, 1917. Though named the Satyagraha Ashram, it became known more commonly as the Sabarmati Ashram. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

Today, Ramesh Bhai (pictured) maintains the Ashram. Before its closure the Ashram was located between a crematorium on one side and a jail on the other, as Gandhi felt that every Satyagraha activist had to go to both places. The Ashram was later shifted to the banks of the river Sabarmati on June 17, 1917. Though named the Satyagraha Ashram, it became known more commonly as the Sabarmati Ashram. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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A view of Gujarat Vidyapith where Gandhi taught the Bible. The years Gandhi spent at Sabarmati were significant in his life. According to Gandhian scholar Ramachandra Guha, the Ashram became the epicentre of Indian politics and Gandhi acquired his first set of dedicated followers in India during this tenure. The birth of Khadi and the Kheda Satyagraha in support of peasants was also launched in this period. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

A view of Gujarat Vidyapith where Gandhi taught the Bible. The years Gandhi spent at Sabarmati were significant in his life. According to Gandhian scholar Ramachandra Guha, the Ashram became the epicentre of Indian politics and Gandhi acquired his first set of dedicated followers in India during this tenure. The birth of Khadi and the Kheda Satyagraha in support of peasants was also launched in this period. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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A portrait of Kalyansinh Rathod, director of Khadi Gram Udyog. In the years after Gandhi’s assassination in 1948, different trusts have taken up the conservation and protection of his legacy, carrying on the work started by him. The Khadi Gramodyog Prayog Samiti does research in spinning, weaving etc, while the Harijan Sevak Sangh works for the removal of untouchability and does research in modern, low-cost sanitation. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

A portrait of Kalyansinh Rathod, director of Khadi Gram Udyog. In the years after Gandhi’s assassination in 1948, different trusts have taken up the conservation and protection of his legacy, carrying on the work started by him. The Khadi Gramodyog Prayog Samiti does research in spinning, weaving etc, while the Harijan Sevak Sangh works for the removal of untouchability and does research in modern, low-cost sanitation. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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Kartikeya Sarabhai is the longest-serving trustee of Gandhi Ashram Memorial Trust. According to him the trust was formed in 1951 with three major objectives – to preserve the physical buildings, Gandhi’s residence; to collect and preserve his writings; and a third, very critical part, was communication – how the modern generation learns about Gandhi. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

Kartikeya Sarabhai is the longest-serving trustee of Gandhi Ashram Memorial Trust. According to him the trust was formed in 1951 with three major objectives – to preserve the physical buildings, Gandhi’s residence; to collect and preserve his writings; and a third, very critical part, was communication – how the modern generation learns about Gandhi. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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Children engaged in educational activities at Manav Sadhana. The memorial trust has taken up projects such as a non-violence programme in schools, to teach children the importance of finding solutions to problems by non-violent methods. Another important work of the trust has been to create the Gandhi Heritage Portal, which in the last six years, has digitised his writings, journals and photos. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

Children engaged in educational activities at Manav Sadhana. The memorial trust has taken up projects such as a non-violence programme in schools, to teach children the importance of finding solutions to problems by non-violent methods. Another important work of the trust has been to create the Gandhi Heritage Portal, which in the last six years, has digitised his writings, journals and photos. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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The years since Gandhi’s death have not been without discord. Last year, descendants of Harijan families living in the Ashram protested during the centenary celebrations and there is also friction between individuals and groups on the use of Ashram land. On a typical day at the Ashram, however, peace still prevails. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on Jun 18, 2018 01:04 PM IST

The years since Gandhi’s death have not been without discord. Last year, descendants of Harijan families living in the Ashram protested during the centenary celebrations and there is also friction between individuals and groups on the use of Ashram land. On a typical day at the Ashram, however, peace still prevails. (Aalok Soni / HT Photo)

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