Photos: On Ganesh Chaturthi eve, Ganpati geared to grace homes

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST 12 Photos
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On the eve of Ganesh Chaturthi, a ten day festival celebrating the birth of Lord Ganesha which begins on August 25 this year, enthusiasm swells among devotees in various parts of the country who will bring the elephant headed god home and culminate festivities with the immersion of idols, signifying his return to Mount Kailash to his parents Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

On the eve of Ganesh Chaturthi, a ten day festival celebrating the birth of Lord Ganesha which begins on August 25 this year, enthusiasm swells among devotees in various parts of the country who will bring the elephant headed god home and culminate festivities with the immersion of idols, signifying his return to Mount Kailash to his parents Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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An artists shows his hands caked in clay used to make idols of the elephant-headed Hindu God Ganesha ahead of Ganesh Chaturthi a workshop, in New Delhi. Ganesha, who is also known as Ganpati and Vinayak is widely worshiped as the god of wisdom, prosperity and good fortune. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

An artists shows his hands caked in clay used to make idols of the elephant-headed Hindu God Ganesha ahead of Ganesh Chaturthi a workshop, in New Delhi. Ganesha, who is also known as Ganpati and Vinayak is widely worshiped as the god of wisdom, prosperity and good fortune. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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First observed during the Maratha empire set up by Chhatrapati Shivaji in the 16th century, the festival in its present form saw resurgence under Bal Gangadhar Tilak as a rallying ground for people beyond caste and class lines and a means of spreading ideas of nationalism and a sense of unity among the Indian population. (Ravi Choudhary/HT PHOTO)

First observed during the Maratha empire set up by Chhatrapati Shivaji in the 16th century, the festival in its present form saw resurgence under Bal Gangadhar Tilak as a rallying ground for people beyond caste and class lines and a means of spreading ideas of nationalism and a sense of unity among the Indian population. (Ravi Choudhary/HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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An artist paints miniature idols of Ganesha at a small-scale workshop. Work on the idols begins months in advance with artisans flocking to areas where the festival is celebrated with fervor to sate the heightened demand. Ganesh Chaturthi, in a way also marks the beginning of the peak season for idol makers who see surges in orders for idols for Durga Puja, Diwali and Dussehra. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

An artist paints miniature idols of Ganesha at a small-scale workshop. Work on the idols begins months in advance with artisans flocking to areas where the festival is celebrated with fervor to sate the heightened demand. Ganesh Chaturthi, in a way also marks the beginning of the peak season for idol makers who see surges in orders for idols for Durga Puja, Diwali and Dussehra. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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A Ganesha idol is worked on by craftsmen while out in the open to dry its plaster. The size and intricacy, as well as the materials used in its making determine the price of the idol. While Plaster of Paris was a go-to option, its negative impact has brought about increased demand for clay based pieces which are eco-friendly, but take considerably longer periods to manufacture. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

A Ganesha idol is worked on by craftsmen while out in the open to dry its plaster. The size and intricacy, as well as the materials used in its making determine the price of the idol. While Plaster of Paris was a go-to option, its negative impact has brought about increased demand for clay based pieces which are eco-friendly, but take considerably longer periods to manufacture. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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Artisans apply finishing touches to an idol of Ganesha, decorating it with faux jewellery. The festival is most commonly associated with the state of Maharashtra, while celebrations also occur widely in Tamil Nadu, Goa and Kerala. The ten day festival is also celebrated by Marathis settled in Delhi with the presence of at least two dozen Ganesh Mandals. (Raj K Raj/HT PHOTO)

Artisans apply finishing touches to an idol of Ganesha, decorating it with faux jewellery. The festival is most commonly associated with the state of Maharashtra, while celebrations also occur widely in Tamil Nadu, Goa and Kerala. The ten day festival is also celebrated by Marathis settled in Delhi with the presence of at least two dozen Ganesh Mandals. (Raj K Raj/HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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The mouse or a shrew is often seen as the ‘vahana’ or vehicle of choice for the happy-go-lucky god who is considered the destroyer of obstacles. Various interpretations attribute this choice to his symbolic taming of the mouse, a common pest for the agricultural population and also the rodents’ ability to reach nooks and crannies allowing Ganesha expedited access to areas in need. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

The mouse or a shrew is often seen as the ‘vahana’ or vehicle of choice for the happy-go-lucky god who is considered the destroyer of obstacles. Various interpretations attribute this choice to his symbolic taming of the mouse, a common pest for the agricultural population and also the rodents’ ability to reach nooks and crannies allowing Ganesha expedited access to areas in need. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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The festival is synonymous with the chants of ‘Ganpati Bappa Morya’ chanted by devotees in processions throughout the 10-day period, calling the deity back to their homes as soon as possible next year. Another icon of the festival is the rice flour based dumpling called Modak, considered a favourite of Ganesha, lending him the additional title of ‘Modakpriya’. (Raj K Raj/HT PHOTO)

The festival is synonymous with the chants of ‘Ganpati Bappa Morya’ chanted by devotees in processions throughout the 10-day period, calling the deity back to their homes as soon as possible next year. Another icon of the festival is the rice flour based dumpling called Modak, considered a favourite of Ganesha, lending him the additional title of ‘Modakpriya’. (Raj K Raj/HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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The festival is synonymous with the chants of ‘Ganpati Bappa Morya’ chanted by devotees in processions throughout the 10-day period, calling the deity back to their homes as soon as possible next year. Another icon of the festival is the rice flour based dumpling called Modak, considered a favourite of Ganesha, lending him the additional title of ‘Modakpriya’. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

The festival is synonymous with the chants of ‘Ganpati Bappa Morya’ chanted by devotees in processions throughout the 10-day period, calling the deity back to their homes as soon as possible next year. Another icon of the festival is the rice flour based dumpling called Modak, considered a favourite of Ganesha, lending him the additional title of ‘Modakpriya’. (Burhaan Kinu / HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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Legend has it that the devas once visited Shiva and Parvati and presented them with a divine modak, with a condition that only the wisest and most knowledgeable had a right to it. Parvati wanted to present it to her sons, but they were unwilling to share it, so she set them a task to go around the world three times. Whoever finished the fastest would win it. Wise Ganesha simply circled his parents, as they were the world to him. Since that day, such has been his love for the sweet that Ganesha is always seen pictured with a modak or a platter of modaks beside him. (Praful Gangurde)

Legend has it that the devas once visited Shiva and Parvati and presented them with a divine modak, with a condition that only the wisest and most knowledgeable had a right to it. Parvati wanted to present it to her sons, but they were unwilling to share it, so she set them a task to go around the world three times. Whoever finished the fastest would win it. Wise Ganesha simply circled his parents, as they were the world to him. Since that day, such has been his love for the sweet that Ganesha is always seen pictured with a modak or a platter of modaks beside him. (Praful Gangurde)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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Devotees taking Lord Ganesha idols to their homes on the occasion of Ganesha Chaturthi festival near Akshardham Temple in New Delhi. (Raj K Raj/HT PHOTO)

Devotees taking Lord Ganesha idols to their homes on the occasion of Ganesha Chaturthi festival near Akshardham Temple in New Delhi. (Raj K Raj/HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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Devotees taking Lord Ganesha idols to their homes on the occasion of Ganesha Chaturthi festival. (Raj K Raj/HT PHOTO)

Devotees taking Lord Ganesha idols to their homes on the occasion of Ganesha Chaturthi festival. (Raj K Raj/HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON AUG 24, 2017 06:48 PM IST
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