Photos: Indonesian search team locates debris of crashed jet

UPDATED ON JAN 11, 2021 11:35 AM IST
Rescue workers inspect recovered items and debris from the Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737-500 aircraft at the port in Jakarta on January 10. Indonesia detected signals on January 10 that could come from a flight recorder of the Sriwijaya Air jet that crashed into the sea soon after taking off from the capital Jakarta on January 9, as human body parts and suspected pieces of the plane were retrieved, Reuters reported.(Dany Krisnadhi / AFP)
Medics and officials at the flight SJ 182 Crisis Centre at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Cengkareng, near Jakarta on January 9. The Boeing 737-500 with 12 crew members and 50 passengers on board was headed to Pontianak in West Kalimantan before it disappeared from radar screens four minutes after takeoff.(Dimas Ardian / Bloomberg)
An officer of Indonesia's Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) observes the weather condition on a screen at the Tanjung Priok port, following the air crash, in Jakarta on January 10. Tracking service Flightradar24 said the aircraft took off at 2:36 pm local time (0736 GMT) and climbed to reach 10,900 feet within four minutes. It then began a steep descent and stopped transmitting data 21 seconds later, Reuters reported.(Willy Kurniawan / REUTERS)
Indonesian soldiers rest as debris of Sriwijaya Air flight SJ 182 is retrieved at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta on January 10. There were no immediate clues on what may have caused the jet's sudden descent. Safety experts stress that most air accidents are caused by a cocktail of factors that can take months to establish.(WIlly Kurniawan / REUTERS)
An Indonesian police officer carries debris of Sriwijaya Air flight SJ 182, at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta on January 10. Pieces of wreckage were brought to Jakarta port by rescuers. One twisted piece of metal was painted in Sriwijaya Air's blue and red colours. Indonesian authorities said they had also retrieved body parts and clothing, Reuters reported.(WIlly Kurniawan / REUTERS)
Indonesian Air Force pilots in the cockpit during an aerial search for the Sriwijaya Air SJ-182, in Jakarta on January 10. The search focuses on the outer ring of the Laki and Lancang islands off the Jakarta coast. The sea in this area is about 20 to 23 metres (65-75 feet) deep.(Willy Kurniawan / REUTERS)
Ships and boats pictured during a search for the Sriwijaya Air flight SJ 182, in Jakarta on January 10. This is the first major air crash in Indonesia since 189 passengers and crew were killed in 2018 when a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max also plunged into the Java Sea soon after takeoff from Soekarno-Hatta International Airport,(Willy Kurniawan / REUTERS)
A bag, believed to be contain remains from the Sriwijaya Air plane flight SJ182 is seen at Jakarta International Container Terminal port in Jakarta on January 10. In 2007, the European Union banned all Indonesian airlines following a series of crashes and reports of deteriorating oversight and maintenance since deregulation in the late 1990s. The restrictions were fully lifted in 2018.(Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana / REUTERS)

Rescue workers inspect recovered items and debris from the Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737-500 aircraft at the port in Jakarta on January 10. Indonesia detected signals on January 10 that could come from a flight recorder of the Sriwijaya Air jet that crashed into the sea soon after taking off from the capital Jakarta on January 9, as human body parts and suspected pieces of the plane were retrieved, Reuters reported. (Dany Krisnadhi / AFP)

Medics and officials at the flight SJ 182 Crisis Centre at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Cengkareng, near Jakarta on January 9. The Boeing 737-500 with 12 crew members and 50 passengers on board was headed to Pontianak in West Kalimantan before it disappeared from radar screens four minutes after takeoff. (Dimas Ardian / Bloomberg)

An officer of Indonesia's Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) observes the weather condition on a screen at the Tanjung Priok port, following the air crash, in Jakarta on January 10. Tracking service Flightradar24 said the aircraft took off at 2:36 pm local time (0736 GMT) and climbed to reach 10,900 feet within four minutes. It then began a steep descent and stopped transmitting data 21 seconds later, Reuters reported. (Willy Kurniawan / REUTERS)

Indonesian soldiers rest as debris of Sriwijaya Air flight SJ 182 is retrieved at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta on January 10. There were no immediate clues on what may have caused the jet's sudden descent. Safety experts stress that most air accidents are caused by a cocktail of factors that can take months to establish. (WIlly Kurniawan / REUTERS)

An Indonesian police officer carries debris of Sriwijaya Air flight SJ 182, at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta on January 10. Pieces of wreckage were brought to Jakarta port by rescuers. One twisted piece of metal was painted in Sriwijaya Air's blue and red colours. Indonesian authorities said they had also retrieved body parts and clothing, Reuters reported. (WIlly Kurniawan / REUTERS)

Indonesian Air Force pilots in the cockpit during an aerial search for the Sriwijaya Air SJ-182, in Jakarta on January 10. The search focuses on the outer ring of the Laki and Lancang islands off the Jakarta coast. The sea in this area is about 20 to 23 metres (65-75 feet) deep. (Willy Kurniawan / REUTERS)

Ships and boats pictured during a search for the Sriwijaya Air flight SJ 182, in Jakarta on January 10. This is the first major air crash in Indonesia since 189 passengers and crew were killed in 2018 when a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max also plunged into the Java Sea soon after takeoff from Soekarno-Hatta International Airport, (Willy Kurniawan / REUTERS)

A bag, believed to be contain remains from the Sriwijaya Air plane flight SJ182 is seen at Jakarta International Container Terminal port in Jakarta on January 10. In 2007, the European Union banned all Indonesian airlines following a series of crashes and reports of deteriorating oversight and maintenance since deregulation in the late 1990s. The restrictions were fully lifted in 2018. (Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana / REUTERS)

About The Gallery

Indonesia on January 10 received emergency signals and retrieved body parts along with debris of the Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737-500 aircraft that crashed into the sea soon after taking off from the capital Jakarta on January 9. The aircraft with 62 passengers and crew was headed to Pontianak in West Kalimantan before it disappeared on January 9 from radar screens four minutes after takeoff. This is the first major air crash in Indonesia since 2018 when 189 passengers and crew members were killed after a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max also plunged into the Java Sea soon after takeoff from Soekarno-Hatta International Airport.

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