IISER Pune can ‘double’ phone’s battery power | pune news | Hindustan Times
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IISER Pune can ‘double’ phone’s battery power

The lithium-ion battery powers your cell phone. It is commonly used in several devices, including laptops. The popularity of the batteries is its rechargeable feature and ability to sustain a charge for a period of time.

pune Updated: Jan 17, 2018 14:34 IST
Ananya Barua
Ananya Barua
Hindustan Times, Pune
battery,phone,mobile
A visual depiction of the IISER-CON1 framework for lithium-ion batteries.(HT Photo)

A team of researchers at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, have developed a covalent organic framework with the ability to boost storage capacity of lithium-ion batteries to almost twice of those available commercially.

The lithium-ion battery powers your cell phone. It is commonly used in several devices, including laptops. The popularity of the batteries is its rechargeable feature and ability to sustain a charge for a period of time.

“So, our aim was to take this ability further and pack more power or higher energy density into these batteries, so as to take it a step closer to being applied to larger devices, like electric vehicles and large power grids.

“To achieve this, we needed new li-ion storage materials which are not only light-weight, but also have high storage capacity. Developing this covalent organic framework was to find an alternative to the graphite anode to store more energy at a faster rate,” says R Vaidhyanathan, scientist and one of the team leads on this research project at IISER.

Graphite anodes are commonly used in commercial lithium-ion batteries and when researchers closely examined the properties of IISER-CON1 (a covalent organic framework which is rich in nitrogen- and oxygen-based functionalities), the team found that it had similar properties to that of a graphite, which includes a layered structure and stacked organisation of the layers. “This revelation motivated us to test the battery performance by replacing the graphite anode with IISER-CON1,” he explained.

The IISER team, in collaboration with CSIR-NCL professor Satish Ogale and his team, developed the IISER-CON1. The research received funding from the ministry of human resource development and from department of science and technology, government of India.

Currently, a number of industries and institutions are vying for collaboration with IISER on the project, Vaidhyanathan added.

The test thus revealed, as according to the researchers, that the IISER-CON1 possesses many of the features of graphite, which are desirable for the research, but with an extra edge of higher energy capacity.

In comparison to graphite, which has a specific capacity of 372 mAh/g in commercial batteries, IISER-CON1 displayed a specific capacity of 720 mAh/g, that is retained even after 1,000 charge or discharge cycles.

According to him, the challenge here was to introduce the right kind of components to scale up the procedure so as to use the framework in large batteries.

This paper, titled ‘High and reversible lithium-ion storage in self-exfoliated triazole-triformyl phloroglucinol based covalent organic nanosheets’ has been accepted for publication in Advanced Energy Materials and is authored by Satishchandra Ogale, Ramanathan Vaidhyanathan, Kingshuk Roy, Shyamapada Nandi, Dhanya Puthusseri, Yogesh Gawli, Debanjan Chakraborty and Sattwick Haldar.

First Published: Jan 16, 2018 14:49 IST