After cholera, vector-borne diseases pose threat in Hoshiarpur | punjab | jalandhar | Hindustan Times
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After cholera, vector-borne diseases pose threat in Hoshiarpur

Poor maintenance of roads, choked drain pipes and deep potholes result in accumulation of water, which become a breeding place for mosquitoes and other carriers of vector-borne diseases.

punjab Updated: Jul 27, 2018 22:35 IST
Harpreet Kaur
Harpreet Kaur
Hindustan Times, Hoshiarpur
cholera,vector-borne,diseases
The water logged road near mini secretariat, Hoshiatpur. (Harpreet Kaur/HT)

With heavy spell of rain in past few days and waterlogged roads, the threat of vector-borne diseases, especially ones by mosquitoes, is looming large in the city, which is already struggling with cholera outbreak, wherein 29 people have been tested positive so far.

Poor maintenance of roads, choked drain pipes and deep potholes result in accumulation of water, which become a breeding place for mosquitoes and other carriers of vector-borne diseases. Public works department is yet to carry out repair works on majority of roads. Even, the road leading to mini secretariat is inundated and the road leading to civil hospital on Jalandhar road becomes a pool after it rains.

Not causing any further delay as done in the case of contaminated water at Kamalpur Colony, the heath department officials are carrying out awareness drives and conducting raids at different localities in city to raise awareness on prevention of water-borne and vector-borne diseases.

‘Prevent accumulation of water’

In one such drive on Friday, health team carried out survey of vulnerable areas and detected dengue larvae at 25 places.

District health officer Dr Sewa Singh said the larvae were destroyed. “People must prevent accumulation of fresh water in houses and their surroundings. Water stored inside should be cleared once a week,” he added. The anti-larvae teams have begun the fogging drive in city.

District epidemiologist Dr Sailesh Kumar said that carriers of malaria and dengue viruses breed in fresh water. “Cholera is caused when potable water gets contaminated while malaria and dengue viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes, who lay their larvae in still water”, he said adding that prevention of accumulation of water can minimise the risk to a large extent.

Meanwhile, city mayor Shiv Sood said that minor repair works will begin immediately while major works can only be carried out after tenders are passed. “Multiple-lot tender system of the government has created a roadblock as single bids are no more accepted. However, we are making temporary arrangements to plug the potholes”, he said. He added, “Due to lack of stormwater system in city, the water doesn’t get drained.”

When asked about the stormwater system, cabinet minister Sunder Sham Arora, said that he would get the project sanctioned from the government. “The project involves a huge investment but I urge the Punjab chief minister and finance minister to approve the project”, he said.

First Published: Jul 27, 2018 22:34 IST