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How brain gathers threat cues, turns them into fear: Study

Most external threats involve multisensory cues, such as the heat, smoke and smell of a wildfire. Previous research showed that different pathways independently relay sound, sight, and touch threat cues to multiple brain areas.

How brain gathers threat cues, turns them into fear: Study(Unsplash)
How brain gathers threat cues, turns them into fear: Study(Unsplash)
Published on Aug 17, 2022 11:53 AM IST
ANI | | Posted by Tapatrisha Das, Washington

Particular brain reactions to traumatic stress are associated with PTSD risk

This association between reduced hippocampal activity and the risk of PTSD was particularly strong in individuals who had greater involuntary defensive reactions to being startled.

Particular brain reactions to traumatic stress are associated with PTSD risk(Shutterstock)
Particular brain reactions to traumatic stress are associated with PTSD risk(Shutterstock)
Updated on Jul 29, 2022 05:03 PM IST
ANI | | Posted by Tapatrisha Das, Washington

Oprah reveals about love, traumatic childhood struggles in What happened to you?

‘I rarely remember feeling loved’: Oprah Winfrey spills the beans on her traumatic childhood and making peace with her past in new co-authored book ‘What happened to you?’ with renowned brain and trauma expert Dr Bruce Perry

Oprah reveals about love, traumatic childhood struggles in What happened to you?(Instagram/oprah/oprahsbookclub)
Oprah reveals about love, traumatic childhood struggles in What happened to you?(Instagram/oprah/oprahsbookclub)
Updated on Apr 28, 2021 01:14 PM IST
ByZarafshan Shiraz

Study links sleep to storing the memory of newly learned material

A new research suggests that sleep is vital to associating emotion with memory and that the 'reactivation' of memories during sleep needs to occur in order to fully store the memory of newly learned material.

Study links sleep to storing the memory of newly learned material(Photo by Zohre Nemati on Unsplash)
Study links sleep to storing the memory of newly learned material(Photo by Zohre Nemati on Unsplash)
Updated on Feb 23, 2021 07:55 AM IST
ANI |

Study: Brain training may help in treating post-traumatic stress disorder

Neurofeedback, also called 'brain training' may be an effective treatment for individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder, suggests a new study.

The findings of the study were published in the journal 'Neurolmage: Clinical'. Neurofeedback consists of exercises where individuals regulate their own brain activity.(Unsplash)
The findings of the study were published in the journal 'Neurolmage: Clinical'. Neurofeedback consists of exercises where individuals regulate their own brain activity.(Unsplash)
Published on Jan 31, 2021 02:04 PM IST
ANI | , Washington [us]
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