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6 Kerkar artworks installed in Yorkshire’s Himalayan Garden

The award-winning Himalayan Garden and Sculpture Park and open-air gallery now has 83 sculptures installed in open, natural spaces, with the Goa-born Kerkar’s artworks commenting on various aspects of Indian history as well as terrorism becoming the latest attraction.

world Updated: Apr 26, 2019 10:57 IST
Prasun Sonwalkar
Prasun Sonwalkar
Hindustan Times, London
Kerkar’s installations combine natural materials from Yorkshire with 10,000 shells shipped from Goa to chronicle Yorkshire’s ancient links with the sea.(HT Photo)

Six life-size artworks by noted Indian sculptor and installation artist Subodh Kerkar have been displayed in a garden, which reminds many of the Himalayan region, in north-central England’s Yorkshire.

The award-winning Himalayan Garden and Sculpture Park and open-air gallery now has 83 sculptures installed in open, natural spaces, with the Goa-born Kerkar’s artworks commenting on various aspects of Indian history as well as terrorism becoming the latest attraction. The garden is spread over 45 acres of lakes, vegetation, and tranquillity.

“The sculptures build on the Himalayan theme as East meets West, with a re-imagining of Yorkshire’s history,” Peter Roberts, who founded the garden with his wife Caroline in 2005 and commissioned Kerkar after admiring his work, said.

“Subodh’s installations inspire peace and reflection as visitors interact with nature. We are very excited about the new work,” Roberts added.

Kerkar, 59, who founded the Museum of Goa and has showcased his work in various countries, has put up the six installations titled Cotton Tree, Laterite Stone Head, Pineapple Disc, The Ocean Comes to Yorkshire, Dialogs and The Book Tree.

His installations combine natural materials from Yorkshire with 10,000 shells shipped from Goa to chronicle Yorkshire’s ancient links with the sea. The Ocean Comes to Yorkshire features logs covered with cowrie and tower shells.

“We live in times of terrorism and telecommunication. Never in the history of human civilisation, telecommunication was so advanced and accessible to all. However, in spite of such technological development, we do not seem to ‘communicate’,” Kerkar said on Dialogs.

More than 3,000 pine cones were collected in the autumn from the gardens and stored for the installation The Pineapple Disc - a sculpture that fuses east and west.

A Book Tree features logs carved with books encased in resin symbolising the process from tree to book, while the Cotton Tree alludes to Yorkshire’s industrial heritage.

The park’s organisers say the sculptures have been chosen and positioned within the landscape in a way that relates to everything around them; the weather, light, vegetation and the close and long-distance views.

The idea is to promote an active relationship, with each sculpture focusing, intensifying and animating its environment. The planting and other features of the park and woodland area seek to enhance the sculptures.

First Published: Apr 25, 2019 10:12 IST