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Home / World News / Boris Johnson plays milkman in last dash before crunch Brexit poll

Boris Johnson plays milkman in last dash before crunch Brexit poll

Guiseley resident Debbie Monaghan opened the door and was surprised to find Johnson in blue overalls with a crate of milk. Debbie said to him: “So nice to meet you prime minister, what you doing up so early.”

world Updated: Dec 11, 2019 16:32 IST
Prasun Sonwalkar
Prasun Sonwalkar
Hindustan Times, London
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson loads a crate into a milk delivery van during a visit to Greenside Farm Business Park, as he campaigns for votes on the last day of campaigning ahead of Thursday's General Election, in Leeds, England, early Wednesday Dec. 11, 2019.
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson loads a crate into a milk delivery van during a visit to Greenside Farm Business Park, as he campaigns for votes on the last day of campaigning ahead of Thursday's General Election, in Leeds, England, early Wednesday Dec. 11, 2019. (AP photo)
         

Prime Minister Boris Johnson played the milkman early on Wednesday morning, promising surprised residents in west Yorkshire that he not only delivers milk, but will also deliver Brexit if he wins majority in Thursday’s election described as most crucial in a generation.

Guiseley resident Debbie Monaghan opened the door and was surprised to find Johnson in blue overalls with a crate of milk. Debbie said to him: “So nice to meet you prime minister, what you doing up so early.”

To which Johnson repeated his main election message that besides delivering milk, he would ‘Get Brexit Done’ and deliver 20,000 new police officers.

Elsewhere in Scotland, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was making similar last-day pitches before the United Kingdom goes to the polls for the third time in four years on Thursday in a febrile atmosphere marked by allegations of lies, blurred party loyalties and deep anxieties about the future spawned by the 2016 vote to leave the European Union.

Opinion polls released on Wednesday suggested the country was heading for another hung parliament, with the gap between Conservative and Labour parties narrowing and neither assured of a clear majority in the 650-member House of Lords.

The significance of Thursday’s election after three years of Brexit talks and inconclusive debates in Westminster is often mentioned in superlatives.

The Guardian said in its editorial: “Britain has not faced a more critical election in decades than the one it faces on Thursday. The country’s future direction, its place in the world and even its territorial integrity are all at stake, primarily because this is a decisive election for Brexit”.

“The choice is stark. The next prime minister is going to be either Boris Johnson, who is focused on ‘getting Brexit done’ whatever the consequences, or Jeremy Corbyn, who with a Labour-led government will try to remodel society with a programme of nationalisation and public spending”.

Former prime ministers John Major and Tony Blair asking voters to vote against their own party candidates is one of several incongruities thrown up by the election that will determine the shape and form of Brexit by the deadline of January 31, if at all it happens.

The basic fault-line between the two main contenders, Conservative and Labour, is this: the former wants a majority to be able to deliver Brexit by the deadline on the basis of an agreement reached, while the latter wants to re-negotiate it and hold another referendum, with the option to remain in the EU.

Thursday’s poll marked by concerted efforts at tactical voting will test the charisma-driven popularity of Johnson and the ideological appeal of Corbyn; an unlikely duo at the top of a country deeply divided over Brexit.

While Johnson has harped on Brexit during the campaign, Corbyn has exerted to widen the challenge beyond Brexit, to the future of the National Health Service, poverty and inequality, education and nationalising essential services such as railways.

Corbyn has effectively put Johnson and the Conservative party on the defensive by claiming, with some evidence, that another Conservative government will allow American private companies into the state-run NHS, insisting that ‘Our NHS is not for sale’.

Johnson, on the other hand, has put Corbyn on the back-foot by repeatedly cornering him for not declaring whether he would vote to remain in the EU or not in a future referendum. Keen to retain the support of both camps, Corbyn has indulged in what is called ‘creative ambiguity’.

Fact-checkers have never been so busy in British elections, with each and every public engagement of leading lights scrutinised amid swirling allegations of lies and a public weary of unending debate about Brexit and paralysis in parliament to pass legislation.

Says Blair: “The truth is: the public aren’t convinced either main Party deserve to win this Election outright. They’re peddling two sets of fantasies; and both, as majority Governments, pose a risk it would be unwise for the country to take.”

Refusing to unequivocally back his party candidates, Major adds: “I am a Conservative, but there have always been policies of other parties with which I agreed…Tribal loyalty has its place…But sometimes you need to vote with your head as well as your heart. To vote for your country and your future. This is such a time”.

An India angle has marked the election as never before, with Labour bearing the brunt of anger in sections of the community for its stand on Kashmir and not nominating an Indian-origin candidate in its stronghold of Leicester East, held for 32 years by Keith Vaz, who stepped down.

Labour continues to enjoy much influence in the 1.5-million strong community but has been haemorrhaging support in recent elections from young, aspirational third generation members, who have increasingly moved to the Conservative party.