Canada extends Covid border restrictions to Sept 30

Updated on Jun 30, 2022 02:45 PM IST
These rules also apply to travellers from India arriving in Canada and the two main vaccines used in India, Covishield and Covaxin, are both approved in Canada for travel
An airplane takes off from Billy Bishop Airport after Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that passengers will require Covid-19 vaccination for air, ship and interprovincial train services, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (REUTERS)
An airplane takes off from Billy Bishop Airport after Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that passengers will require Covid-19 vaccination for air, ship and interprovincial train services, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (REUTERS)

Canada extended all existing Covid-related border restrictions till at least September 30 this year, the government announced on Wednesday.

The restrictions include a mandatory 14-day quarantine for everyone except the fully vaccinated, which in this case means having taken the primary series of two doses of a Covid-19 vaccine approved by Canadian health authorities.

These rules also apply to travellers from India arriving in Canada and the two main vaccines used in India, Covishield and Covaxin, are both approved in Canada for travel.

Those not considered fully vaccinated will also be tested on the first and eighth days after their entry into Canada.

All incoming travellers will continue to be required to fill in their details, including vaccination status, on ArriveCAN within 72 hours before their arrival in Canada. The app can be accessed on mobile devices or through its website.

In addition, the government also said random Covid testing of passengers will remain on pause till July 15. It was initially stopped on June 11 after the policy resulted in extreme delays at Canadian airports.

Once it is reintroduced, the testing regimen -- including randomly selected passenger -- will be shifted offsite to “test provider stores, pharmacies, or by virtual appointment”, according to a release from the Public Health Agency of Canada on Wednesday.

Canada’s minister of health Jean-Yves Duclos said, “As we move into the next phase of our Covid-19 response, it is important to remember that the pandemic is not over. We must continue to do all that we can to keep ourselves and others safe from the virus. It is also important for individuals to remain up to date with the recommended vaccinations to ensure they are adequately protected against infection, transmission, and severe complications.”

Meanwhile, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) on Wednesday released an interim vaccination guidance, which strongly recommended that those belonging to vulnerable groups, like senior citizens (aged 65 or over), should be offered another booster dose this fall, regardless of the number of such shots they received previously.

It also issued a discretionary advisory that those aged between 12 and 64 could also be offered such a dose in the fall.

“The likelihood, timing, and severity of a future wave of Covid-19 is uncertain. There may be an increase in Covid-19 activity in the later fall and winter seasons as people spend more time together indoors,” NACI said in a statement.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Anirudh Bhattacharya is a Toronto-based commentator on North American issues, and an author. He has also worked as a journalist in New Delhi and New York spanning print, television and digital media. He tweets as @anirudhb.

Close Story
QUICKREADS

Less time to read?

Try Quickreads

  • File photo of Sri Lanka's then president, Gotabaya Rajapaksa.

    Ex-Sri Lankan president Gotabaya Rajapaksa arrives in Thailand

    Former Sri Lanka President Gotabaya Rajapaksa arrived in Thailand Thursday evening following his departure from Singapore. Rajapaksa was granted entry into Thailand following a request from the Sri Lankan government, NewsWire reported. He left Singapore on Thursday after nearly a month's stay in Singapore. Sri Lankan Parliament Speaker Mahinda Yapa Abeywardena announced the official resignation of Rajapaksa on July 15. Sri Lanka has been facing its worst economic crisis since its independence.

  • Chinese Yuan Wang 5 military vessel has the ability to map ocean beds and track satellites of adversary nations.

    Chinese vessel won't dock at Sri Lanka's Hambantota Port as scheduled: Report

    China's high-tech Chinese research vessel, which was to dock at Sri Lanka's Hambantota Port, won't reach there as scheduled, according to a media report on Thursday, citing the port authorities. Newsfirst.lk website reported that the Harbour Master for the Hambantota Port said no vessel can enter the port without his permission. It said the Chinese ballistic missile and satellite tracking ship 'Yuan Wang 5' will not reach Hambantota Port on Thursday.

  • A customer pumps gas at an Exxon gas station in Miami.

    US gasoline prices fall below $4 for first time since March

    The average price of US retail gasoline fell below $4 per gallon on Thursday for the first time in months, giving some relief to drivers in the world's largest consumer of the fuel. The national average price for regular unleaded gas fell to $3.990 a gallon on Thursday, according to the American Automobile Association. The latest price drop may help President Joe Biden's administration and Democrats in Congress during November's midterm elections.

  • A view shows the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict outside.

    Ukraine accuses Russia of fresh shelling near Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant

    Russia and Ukraine accused each other of new shelling near the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant on Thursday ahead of a UN Security Council meeting to address concerns over the facility's security. Kyiv nuclear agency Energoatom said later that there had been fresh Russian shelling near one of the plant's six reactors that had caused "extensive smoke" and "several radiation sensors are damaged". The Security Council is expected to meet at 1900 GMT.

  • A health care worker prepares a dose of Imvanex, a vaccine to protect against Monkeypox virus.

    White people get bigger share of monkeypox shots, early data show

    Much like with Covid-19, the monkeypox health crisis in the US is hitting Black and Hispanic Americans hard. Yet those groups are so far lagging in vaccination rates, early data obtained by Bloomberg News show. In some major US cities with outbreaks, White people are getting the majority of vaccinations, data collected by Bloomberg show. In Chicago, 55% of vaccines have gone to White people. In Washington, D.C., 63.5% of vaccine recipients identify as White.

SHARE
Story Saved
×
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Friday, August 12, 2022
Start 15 Days Free Trial Subscribe Now