Pentagon releases 3 ‘UFO’ videos officially. Here’s why

Two of the videos, published by the New York Times in 2017, show fast-moving oblong objects racing through the sky and a pilot, in one video yelling, “Look at that thing, dude. It’s rotating!”
The US department of defense (DOD) said it has authorised the release of three videos, one taken in November 2004 and the other two in January 2015, “which have been circulating in the public domain after unauthorised releases in 2007 and 2017”.(Getty Images/iStockphoto/ Representational Photo)
The US department of defense (DOD) said it has authorised the release of three videos, one taken in November 2004 and the other two in January 2015, “which have been circulating in the public domain after unauthorised releases in 2007 and 2017”.(Getty Images/iStockphoto/ Representational Photo)
Updated on May 29, 2020 07:13 PM IST
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New Delhi | ByHT Correspondent

The Pentagon has released three declassified videos, previously released by a private company, that show US navy pilots encountering what appear to be unidentified flying objects (UFOs).

The US department of defense (DOD) said it has authorised the release of three videos, one taken in November 2004 and the other two in January 2015, “which have been circulating in the public domain after unauthorised releases in 2007 and 2017”.

“DOD is releasing the videos in order to clear up any misconceptions by the public on whether or not the footage that has been circulating was real, or whether or not there is more to the videos. The aerial phenomena observed in the videos remain characterized as “unidentified”,” a statement on its website said.

“After a thorough review, the department has determined that the authorized release of these unclassified videos does not reveal any sensitive capabilities or systems, and does not impinge on any subsequent investigations of military air space incursions by unidentified aerial phenomena,” the statement said.

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The three videos, whose veracity was confirmed by the Pentagon in 2019, show what the pilots saw during training flights in 2004—when they encountered an object 40 feet long hovering about 50 feet above the water—and in 2015.

Two of the videos, published by the New York Times in 2017, show fast-moving oblong objects racing through the sky and a pilot, in one video yelling, “Look at that thing, dude. It’s rotating!”

The other video was released by the To the Stars Academy of Arts & Science group, a media and private science organisation, in 2018. To The Stars Academy of Arts & Sciences, co-founded by former Blink-182 musician Tom DeLonge, says it studies information about unidentified aerial phenomena.

The Pentagon has studied recordings of aerial encounters with unidentified objects before as part of a classified program that was launched at the behest of former Senator Harry Reid of Nevada. The program was shuttered in 2012.

“I’m glad the Pentagon is finally releasing this footage, but it only scratches the surface of research and materials available. The U.S. needs to take a serious, scientific look at this and any potential national security implications. The American people deserve to be informed,” Reid tweeted.

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