Vijay Mallya’s Twitter handle hacked, attackers say they have stolen his passwords | india-news | Hindustan Times
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Vijay Mallya’s Twitter handle hacked, attackers say they have stolen his passwords

Industrialist Vijay Mallya has said that his Twitter account has been hacked and the outfit responsible for this was blackmailing him.

india Updated: Dec 09, 2016 13:45 IST
HT Correspondent
File photo of industrialist Vijay Mallya.
File photo of industrialist Vijay Mallya.(AFP)

Embattled liquor baron Vijay Mallya’s Twitter account appeared to have been taken over by hackers, who posted what they claimed were financial details of the former parliamentarian accused of defaulting on bank loans more than Rs 9000 crores.

Mallya appeared to have taken back control briefly when he said his account has been hacked and an “outfit called legion has hacked my e-mail accounts and are blackmailing me”.

“What a joke,” Mallya wrote before the hackers took over again.

Barely a week ago, Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi’s Twitter account was also hacked, apparently by the same “legion”, and profanities and threats posted.

The hackers tweeted from Mallya’s account tagging Gandhi, indicating both incidents were the handiwork of the same people.

“@OfficeOfRG, you have not been forgotten…,” the hackers wrote on Mallya’s timeline.

In a series of tweets, the hackers also posted what they said were e-mail IDs and paswords of Mallya, who left the country in March as creditor banks closed in on him to recover dues running up to Rs 9,400 crores.

The flamboyant businessman, once known as the ‘king of good times’, is believed to be in Britain where he owns properties and businesses.

The Indian government suspended his diplomatic passport after a special court in Mumbai issued non-bailable warrants against Mallya.

A group of banks led by the State Bank of India (SBI) has already rejected his offer to repay part of the dues and told the Supreme Court they wanted him to return to India so they could negotiate with him personally over the total owed.

His massive debt has become a symbol of Indian banks’ vast volume of bad loans -- those already in default or close to it -- which are seen as a threat to financial stability in Asia’s third largest economy.