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Home / Cities / Global Law Conference at Chandigarh University: Need cheaper scientific measures to deal with solid waste, say experts

Global Law Conference at Chandigarh University: Need cheaper scientific measures to deal with solid waste, say experts

Say monetising power produced by solid waste can generate wealth

cities Updated: Nov 18, 2019 00:44 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, Chandigarh
Delhi high court judge Suresh Kumar Kait felicitating river conservationist Balbir Singh Seechewal as Himachal Pradesh high court chief justice Lingappa Narayana Swamy and Chandigarh University chancellor Satnam Singh Sandhu (extreme right) look on at Chandigarh University in Mohali on Sunday.
Delhi high court judge Suresh Kumar Kait felicitating river conservationist Balbir Singh Seechewal as Himachal Pradesh high court chief justice Lingappa Narayana Swamy and Chandigarh University chancellor Satnam Singh Sandhu (extreme right) look on at Chandigarh University in Mohali on Sunday.(HT PHOTO)
         

Effective solid waste management is a transnational challenge and requires cheaper scientific solutions to stop landfill site creation.

Chief justice of Himachal Pradesh high court, Lingappa Narayana Swamy, said this during the Global Law Conference at Chandigarh University on Sunday.

While speaking on municipal solid waste during one of the technical sessions Swamy said, “Municipal corporations in cities cannot just act as agencies, which transport waste material from urban areas to rural areas. We need to deal with waste scientifically.”

He added that the population in the country was producing 63 million tonnes of municipal solid waste every year.

With the increase in population and increased purchase power, the generation of solid waste will increase at an annual rate of 10% causing huge storage problem for the country, he
said.

Justice Swamy said, “Monetising power produced by waste is a method to generate wealth from waste and India has a huge potential to generate wealth from its municipal solid waste, which is currently 500 MW and will be 1,075 MW by 2031.”

Justice Suresh Kumar Kait, judge at Delhi High Court, said, “Indian traditions and religious rituals have always worshipped nature, but it is time to use
biodegradable materials during immersion in rivers and seas so that the ecological balance in water can be maintained.”

“Unbridled increase in population is the biggest challenge for sustainable development and environmental protection as it puts pressure on natural
resources which results in the degradation of environment” said Satya Pal Jain, additional solicitor general and former Member of Parliament.