Haridwar hosts winged guests from Europe | dehradun | Hindustan Times
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Haridwar hosts winged guests from Europe

Over 50 avian species have been arriving in large numbers to Uttarakhand in the last few years, according to Professor Dinesh Bhatt, principal investigator of the Bird Bio-diversity and Biaacoustics laboratory, Gurukul Kangri University.

dehradun Updated: Nov 11, 2017 20:22 IST
Sandeep Rawat 
Migratory birds at Neeldhara-Bhimgoda and Rajaji Tiger Reserve are a major attraction for avian watchers and tourists.
Migratory birds at Neeldhara-Bhimgoda and Rajaji Tiger Reserve are a major attraction for avian watchers and tourists.(RAMESWAR GAUR/HT PHOTO)

HARIDWAR: Bhimgoda and the outskirts of the Rajaji reserve are now host to flocks of migratory birds arriving from Palaearctic region that includes Europe, Russia up to Pacific coast and Mediterranean up to Sahara.

Migratory birds are also arriving at Asan Conservation Reserve, Dakpathar barrage and Pashu Lok barrage in Rishikesh. “These days it’s a paradise for bird lovers as one can see migratory birds basking on the Ganga river bed.I come daily in afternoon to have glimpse of these birds. Once, Rajaji opens on November 15, these migratory birds will attract large number of tourists,” bird lover Avdesh Shivpuri said.

Over 50 avian species have been arriving in large numbers to Uttarakhand in the last few years, according to Professor Dinesh Bhatt, principal investigator of the Bird Bio-diversity and Biaacoustics laboratory, Gurukul Kangri University.

As the Scandinavian and European countries receive snowfall during the winter, the birds fly thousands of kilometres to arrive in northern India,where the cold is less and sunshine easily available.Prominent species sighted in this part of the state are Teal, Pintail, Pochard, Ruddy shelduck and Mallard.

But urbanisation and construction activity near the Neeldhara-Saptsarovar-Bhimgoda barrage and the Rajaji outskirts have affected arrival of migratory birds. “Species such as Lapwing, Osprey, Black-necked crane and Painted Stork are less visible these days. Heavy traffic flow on National Highway-58 near Har-Ki-Pauri-Neeldhara stretch has affected arrival of migratory birds,” Bhatt said.

The ornithologist has been monitoring movement of migratory birds for the last three decades.