NTCA nod for Rajaji tiger translocation likely on November 27 | dehradun | Hindustan Times
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NTCA nod for Rajaji tiger translocation likely on November 27

Three tigers -- two females from Haridwar and one male from Corbett landscape – are likely to be translocated soon to western part of Rajaji Tiger Reserve (RTR), in a move to give tiger population a major boost

dehradun Updated: Nov 07, 2017 20:07 IST
Nihi Sharma
Rajaji will be third in the country after Sariska (Rajasthan) and Panna (MP), where tiger translocation was done.
Rajaji will be third in the country after Sariska (Rajasthan) and Panna (MP), where tiger translocation was done. (HT File)

Three tigers -- two females from Haridwar and one male from Corbett landscape – are likely to be translocated soon to western part of Rajaji Tiger Reserve (RTR), in a move to give tiger population a major boost.

The state forest department is likely to get nod from the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) on November 27 for radio collaring the identified tigers during technical committee meeting.

The much-awaited tiger translocation in the state has finally started taking wings. After Sariska (Rajasthan) and Panna (Madhya Pradesh), where translocation was done reporting disappearance of big cats due to poaching and other reasons, Rajaji would be the third reserve to report translocation of tigers.

The western part of Rajaji has only two female tigers and is divided with the eastern part through narrow corridor which remains abuzz with traffic and other interventions due to which movement of tigers has been blocked.

The effort will help acquire big cat population in the western part which is spacious 570 sq km as compared to eastern part which is 150 sq km.

The reserve reported 34 tigers during Phase IV an increase of 18 tigers as compared to Phase IV monitoring of 2014.

Digvijay Singh Khati, chief wildlife warden, told Hindustan Times, “The translocation was halted for few months due to monsoon. But, after getting written approval from NTCA on November 27, we will radio-collar tigers after which they will be introduced in the reserve.”

Officers claim the two female tigresses in the western part are adults and are more than 12 years old. So, there’s a possibility that they won’t breed.

As a result, the plan is to bring two tigresses from Haridwar forest division- particularly from an area where these individuals have failed to claim any territory.

Meanwhile, to maintain genetic viability, a tiger would be translocated from Corbett landscape. All three have been identified and through field staff and cameras, their monitoring is being done.

The radio-collar process is highly technical which includes permission from NTCA, procurement of the right drug and engaging an expert for tranquilising. The forest department will take support from experts of Wildlife Institute of India (WII).

Once radio collared, the tigers would again be translocated to Rajaji where they will be released in big cages that will have trees and prey base.

After a few weeks when the translocated tigers would get accustomed with the environment, they would left free but the radio collars won’t be detached to report and monitor their movement.