A training station in Deoli where CISF personnel are taught how to keep Delhi Metro safe | delhi news | Hindustan Times
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A training station in Deoli where CISF personnel are taught how to keep Delhi Metro safe

At the training centre in Rajasthan’s Deoli, CISF has developed a replica of a Metro station to train officials to handle challenges specific to the rail system.

delhi Updated: Feb 26, 2018 13:08 IST
Faizan Haidar
Faizan Haidar
Hindustan Times
Delhi Metro,CISF,Metro training
Personnel take part in a training exercise at the CISF’s Regional Training Centre in Deoli in Rajasthan.(Arvind Yadav/HT PHOTO)

A drunken passenger walks in for frisking inside the Delhi Metro and is stopped by the Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) staff. As he starts a scuffle with the personnel, the passenger is forcibly taken to a corner with other CISF personnel surrounding him. For the next few seconds, the frisking point is unmanned and many passengers end up entering the station premises unchecked.

This was a demonstration of how not to handle a drunken passenger. The demo was taking place 400 km from Delhi at Deoli, a remote town in Rajasthan, where the CISF has developed a replica of a Metro station along with cut out of a train and other equipment seen at a Metro station.

Nearly 3,500 security personnel are expected to join the Delhi Metro this year to fulfil the requirement for expansion during Phase-3. The CISF’s Regional Training Centre (RTC) at Deoli is the best-suited facility to train the constables who are set to join the Metro.

While there are five others RTCs, it is only at Deoli, that the CISF has developed a replica of the Delhi Metro system as officials said most of the recruits coming in were not aware of the rail system.

“We call it competence-based training (CBT) where the recruit is trained in a real environment. Whenever a CISF constable joins the force, they undergo rigorous training. Then when the posting for Delhi Metro comes, the constable has to undergo refresher course so that they can understand the Metro system. By providing a Metro-like infrastructure in the training centre, we are making their job easier,” said Saroj Malik, DIG of the Deoli training centre.

Apart from a perfect cut section of Metro station and depot, the training centre includes a structural map of the Delhi Metro, depots along with replicas of different sections of the Metro station.

Personnel receive training at the CISF Regional Training centre in Deoli in Rajasthan. (Arvind Yadav/HT PHOTO)

“These sections include ticket counters, a frisking point with a baggage scanner machine, door frame and handheld metal detector, automatic fare collection machines, dome cameras, Metro platform, realistic Metro coaches, security room and dummy bomb detection and dog squads. Samples of all the important registers, contingency plans and equipment are shown to the recruits to give them a hands-on training,” Malik said.

According to a CISF officer posted on the Delhi Metro, recruits coming from Deoli are better trained and aware of the Metro system.

“Usually whenever a batch of new personnel arrives, we have to keep a familiarisation course for 15-30 days. But those coming from Deoli are not required to go through that course and can be straightaway posted for duty,” the officer said.

The constables, who are part of the training, said these activities also help them in reducing the stress of the training period.

“While acting as a drunken or suicidal passenger, we feel that we are part of a play. Everyone gets the opportunity to act. The replicas are also prepared by us and it felt like a practical during school time when you are assigned a craft project,” said a CISF constable, who did not wish to be named.

Last year, the CISF recruited 20,449 constables and RTC Deoli was entrusted with the task of training 6,343 of them. The training structures have been prepared by waste material and constables have helped the CISF in preparation of the replica.

“Apart from familiarisation with the Metro system, we also give them live demos on handling drunken passengers, preventing suicide attempts and handling unattended bags. We tell them the right way to do it and also inform them what not to do during that time. Because of these training, we have been able to prevent many cases of suicide,” Malik said.

Personnel receive training at the CISF Regional Training Centre in Deoli in Rajasthan. (Arvind Yadav/HT PHOTO)
Focus on airport security

Since most of the recruits are not also aware of the airport infrastructure; a cut out of the airport has also been placed at the RTC. Every part of the airport is defined in the structures: from departure gates to an ATC tower and airside along with immigration and customs area.

“We also offer courses in anti-terrorism, VIP security, bomb disposal and gender sensitisation. We are also planning to have cut outs of other installations where CISF is posted,” Malik added.

The CISF is responsible for the security of 59 airports across country and more are likely to be added in coming years.

With aviation sector expecting robust growth, a large number of security personnel will be required.

“I did not even know what an airport looks like. Over here, I have been shown the types of ticket a passenger can carry and how to read it to allow entry. Then we were told the differences between the arrival and the departure hall and cargo terminal,” said a constable who was part of the training.

Another CISF officer said that aviation security is among the most crucial responsibilities entrusted to the CISF and new recruits are also trained to handle different emergencies such as lone wolf attacks and attempted hi-jacking.

First Published: Feb 26, 2018 13:07 IST